school_bell

Ornate Bell-Adobe Illustrator Tutorial

In this Illustrator tutorial, I’ll demonstrate how to create an ornate bell using Adobe Illustrator. The creation process is quite simple: We will create shapes using the Pen Tool and Pathfinder Panel, as well as mix and match color gradients until we achieve a nice 3D result. Let’s get down to business!

Preview

Step 1: Set Up a New Illustrator Document

Open up Illustrator and create a new document by pressing Ctrl/Cmd + N. Set the artboard’s size to 400×500px.

Step 2: Create the Basic Outline

When you have to draw an object with symmetrical sides, it’s much easier to create just one side and then make a mirror copy of it — this not only saves time, but more importantly, ensures that the two sides are identical and symmetrical.

First, Grab the Pen Tool (P) and draw just one side of the bell.

Select the vector path we just drew with the Selection Tool (V) and then choose Object > Transform > Reflect. Choose the Vertical option and then click on the Copy button to create a mirror image of the vector path.

Hold down Shift (to constrain the movement horizontally) and then drag the copy to the right until the upper terminal anchor points match.

Grab the Direct Selection Tool (A) and select only the endpoints of both paths. Right-click on the anchor points and choose Join in the menu that appears.

Let’s completely close the path. Switch to the Pen Tool (P) and click on the lower endpoints to close the path. Remove the Stroke and set the Fill color of the vector object to red just to make things easier to see (we will change this color later on).

Step 3: Dividing the Bell Shape into Segments

We have to try to get rid of the flatness of our bell. In order to do that, we will divide the shape of the bell into several segments, and then we’ll fill those segments with color gradients to simulate a 3D appearance later on.

With the Pen Tool, draw two arcs as shown below.

Switch to the Selection Tool (V) to select the shape of the bell and one of the arcs, and then, in the Pathfinder Panel (press Shift + Ctrl/Cmd + F9 if the panel is hidden), click on the Divide button. This segments our bell shape into two parts.

While the resultant object is still selected, ungroup it (Shift + Ctrl/Cmd + G). Then select the lower part of the bell shape and the other arc, then hit the Divide button again. This will create the lowest part of the bell. Our bell shape should now be divided into 3 parts.

Step 4: Create the Bottom of the Bell

Grab the Ellipse Tool (L) and create an ellipse for the lower part of the bell. Make sure to match the anchor points on the left and right so that you end up with smooth, contiguous sides.

Step 5: Divide the Upper Part in Half

Now we have to divide the upper part of the bell in half. This will enable us to apply color gradients more easily.

Choose the Line Tool (/) and draw a straight vertical line down the middle of the bell.

To make sure the vertical line is dead-smack at the center, select all the segments of the bell and the vertical line, then, in the Align Panel (Press Shift + F7 to toggle the panel’s visibility), click on the Horizontal Align Center button.

Next, select the line and just the upper part of the bell. Then press the Divide button in the Pathfinder Panel.

Ungroup (Shift + Ctrl/Cmd + G) the resultant object and then get ready for some fun. We’re going to apply gradients next!

Step 6: Applying Color Gradients

Let’s choose some good colors and create color gradients to make our bell come alive.

To start, make sure the Gradient Panel is open; if you can’t locate it in your workspace, go to Window > Gradient or press Ctrl/Cmd + F9. We will apply the same radial gradient to both upper sides of the bell.

For the middle part of the bell, we will use a linear gradient.

And for the lower part of the bell, we will also use a linear gradient.

For the ellipse, we will use linear gradients too.

Let’s create the thickness of the bell. To do this, we have to duplicate the ellipse we already have and then we need to scale it down.

Apply the radial gradient as shown below.

Step 7: Adding Reflections and Shadows

In this step, we will create the necessary reflections and shadows in order to be accurate with the light source.

Golden objects are capable of reflecting light in different ways. We will use that ability to create all sorts of reflections (dark, light, semi-transparent, etc.).

In this process, the Pathfinder Panel will have a major role.

Select all parts of the bell, except the ellipses. Duplicate them (Ctrl/Cmd + C, Ctrl/Cmd + F) and unite them using the Unite Pathfinder command.

To create a reflection, we will have to combine a copy of the shape we’ve just created with the copy of the different parts of the bell. Let’s try this out to see what we can create.

Duplicate the green shape of the bell and, in the Layers Panel, lock the original object and then hide it. We will save the shape for later, but for now, we lock and hide it so it won’t disturb us as we continue working.

Select the visible copy of the green shape and nudge it 2px to the right and 2px down.

Duplicate all three visible parts of the left side of the bell. Then, make three copies of the green shape (one for each of the duplicate parts).

Combine each copy of the bell with each copy of the green shape using the Minus Front button in the Pathfinder Panel. This will create small reflection shapes on the left side of the bell.

Set the Fill color of the reflection to #FFFABC.

Select the remaining green shape of the bell and move it to the right a little bit more.

Create the copy of the upper part of the bell on the left side and a copy of the green shape. Select both copies and hit the Minus Front button in the Pathfinder Panel.

Apply a linear gradient to the new shape.

In order to create another reflection, repeat the previous process.

Copy the green shape and move the copy to the right. Select both shapes and, in the Pathfinder Panel, click on the Minus Front button.

We have to intersect the shape with other parts of the bell. Create copies of each part of the bell on the left side and two copies of the green shape. Select each copy of the bell and the copy of the green shape and click on the Intersect button in the Pathfinder Panel.

Apply a linear gradient to the new shapes.

For the right side of the bell, we will need a few reflections and a couple of shadows as well.

I think you get the idea of how to create all the shapes you need, so I’ll let you make them yourself. You just have to combine different shapes and fill them with the right colors.

Now it is time to unlock and toggle the visibility of the green shape we created earlier. You will need it to create the shadows and reflections on the right side of the bell.

For the shadows, apply the linear gradient below.

Feel free to play around with gradients until you achieve a desirable result.

Also, create a small edge reflection on the right side.

Step 8: Create Horizontal Curvatures

We want to reinforce the shape of the bell better. To do this, we should define the curvatures of the bell horizontally.

Duplicate the middle part of the bell twice and nudge one of the copies a few pixels downwards. You can scale up the copy if needed. Select both copies and, under the Pathfinder Panel, click on the Minus Front button. The resultant object should be a horizontal strip.

Apply the radial gradient on the horizontal strip as shown below.

Now we need to intersect the shape with the reflections and shadows we made earlier. This means we need to make copies of each part we want to use to intersect.

Create another strip below the first one and give it a radial gradient.

We need highlights now. Using the same technique for creating reflections, try to create fine highlighted edges on the strips. Give the highlights a thickness of about 1px.

Set the Fill color of the highlights to #FFFABC.

Step 9: Create a Shadow Inside the Bell

Now we need a shadow inside the bell. Select the inner ellipse of the bell and copy it in front. Grab the Ellipse Tool (L) from the Tools Panel and create the blue ellipse shown below.

Select the blue ellipse and the inner ellipse copy and then, under the Pathfinder Panel, hit the Minus Front button.

Apply the linear gradient shown below in order to create the inner shadow.

Step 10: Creating a Clapper

Bells need a clapper inside it to make sound; it’s the component of a bell that hits the inner walls of the bell to make ringing sounds.

To start, grab the Ellipse Tool (L) and create a circle at the bottom right of the bell.

Duplicate the inner ellipse of the bell. Select the duplicate and the red circle we created and press the Intersect button in the Pathfinder Panel.

All we need is to apply a nice radial gradient in order to give the clapper a 3D appearance.

Duplicate the clapper, apply the linear gradient shown below, rotate it a bit and send it behind the clapper. This is the shadow the clapper is creating on the inner wall of the bell.

Step 11: Create a Crown

We now need to create a handle on top of the bell (known as the crown). To create a crown, we will need two ellipses and a few reflections.

To begin, grab the Ellipse Tool (L) and create two circles on top of each other, with the one on top smaller than the one below it. Make sure that the inner circle is centered on the bigger circle by using the Horizontal Align Center and Vertical Align Center command in the Align Panel.

Select both circles and press the Minus Front button in the Pathfinder Panel.

Apply the linear gradient shown below.

Next, we will create a highlight object. Duplicate the crown twice. Move them to form a highlighting shape, select them both and then hit the Minus Front button in the Pathfinder Panel. Then give the highlight object a linear gradient (as shown below).

Select all the parts of the crown, group it (Ctrl/Cmd + G) and place it on the top of the bell. Send it back (Shift/Ctrl/Cmd + [).

At the end, you can add decorations such as a sign or a colorful ribbon, as I have below.

Tutorial Summary

Lots of people have trouble with the Pen Tool, but thankfully the Pathfinder commands allow us to make sophisticated illustrations using simple shape-drawing tools such as the Ellipse Tool. With a lot of imagination, there is almost nothing you can’t create with Pathfinder commands.

I hope you liked the tutorial. Thank you for reading!

Download Source Files

Credit to:

http://designinstruct.com

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final

Create a Vector Snake Using Mesh Tormentor – Illustrator CS5 Tutorial

Final Image Preview

In this tutorial we will learn how to create a vector snake using the Mesh Tormentor – Free Gradient Mesh plugin, which will make your work with the gradient mesh simple and enjoyable. I was trying to describe the creation of a complex object in order to reveal more features of this wonderful plugin, but believe me, it can do much more than I managed to describe. The matter depends on your imagination.


Tutorial Details

  • Program: Adobe Illustrator CS5, Mesh Tormentor;
  • Difficulty: Intermediate
  • Estimated Completion Time: 2 Hours

Step 1

Take the Pen Tool (P) and create a broken outline as it is shown in the figure below. This outline determines the shape of the snake body and can be arbitrary.

Select the anchor points of the outline with the Direct Selection Tool (A) and convert them from corner into smooth ones. By controlling the handles of the anchor points, try to bring the outline to a perfect shape.


Step 2

For further work we need to know the length of the created outline. Select the outline, open the Document Info palette, select Objects in the palette menu and write down or memorize the length value.


Step 3

Take the Rectangle Tool (M) and draw a rectangle, so that its width was equal to the length of the outline that you created earlier.

Now begin to transform a rectangle into a shape resembling a snake, stretched horizontally. With the Pen Tool (P) put a new anchor point in the center of the right side of the rectangle and with the same tool remove its right corners. As a result we got a triangle shown in the figure below.


Step 4

Now add a new anchor point in the center of the left side of the triangle.

Direct Selection Tool (A) select left corners of the triangle and move them slightly to the right while holding down the Shift key.

Create a vertical guide and place it as shown below. Lock the guide in the Layers palette, take the Pen Tool (P) and create two new anchor points at the intersection of the figure with the guide.

Move the created points to the center of the shape, you can use the arrow keys.

Select all the points of the snake head and convert them from corner into smooth ones.


Step 5

Add two more points in the middle of the snake body, move them from the axis of the shape and convert into smooth ones.

Move the created shape into Brushes palette, choose the Art Brush and check the Stretch Between Guides option in the dialog box.

Of course, you can ask a reasonable question: why did we create the shape of the brush of a certain length, when anyway it will stretch along the path? Be patient, you will understand why I did it when it comes to the scale.


Step 6

Now the “try on” the brush to the outline created at the beginning of this tutorial. Select the path and click on the brush image in the Brushes palette.

Thus, our snake needs editing. We can adjust the shape of a snake, by changing the stroke width in the Stroke palette.

As well as moving the guides in the Art Brush dialog window. You can get the access to the parameters of the brush through the Appearance palette, or double-clicking on the image of the brush in the Brushes palette.

Watch the shape of the snake in the process of editing, when it gains an acceptable result, click on the OK button in the dialog box, Art Brush, then Apply to Stroke.

Write down all the brush settings, we will need them in step 10.


Step 7

Now, when it fits perfectly, apply the basic stroke to the outline, canceling the applied brush in the Appearance palette.

Copy this outline and paste it in front (Cmd / Ctrl + C; Cmd / Ctrl + F), locking the upper outline in the layers palette and make it invisible, it will be needed in further creation. Do not skip this step, it is very important!


Step 8

It’s time to launch heavy metal. Further on we will be working with the Mesh Tormentor, it is a plugin for work with the Gradient Mesh. You can download and learn more about its features following these links.

Duplicate the created shape of the brush, drag it down holding down the Opt / Alt. Select the bottom of the shape and go to Object> Create Gradient Mesh …. Set the number of rows and columns in the dialog box and select the Appearance: To Center, to add dissimilarity to our image.


Step 9

Open the Mesh Tormentor palette, it will be available from the Windows menu after installing the plugin. Select the mesh object and click on Make BMG button. This operation transforms the mesh object into a set of simple vector objects with the same geometry as the original object.


Step 10

Now drag the created group of objects to the Brushes palette and save it as an Art Brush with the same parameters as the brush we created in step 6.

Apply a new brush to the contour of the snake, and set the same stroke width as in step 6.


Step 11

Keeping the snake selected, go to Object> Expand Appearance.

Now we have to do the opposite action – turn a set of objects into a mesh object. To do this, simply click on the Convert BMG into mesh button.


Step 12

As you can see, we got artifacts on the areas of mesh overlapping. This happens because the whole object lies in one plane. To achieve the desired result mesh object should be cut into pieces. Cut the mesh with the Split command from the Mesh Tormentor palette. It divides the mesh into two parts along the line passing through selected side node.

If the existing lines of the mesh are not in those areas, create new ones using the Gradient Mesh Tool (U) and divide the mesh along these lines.


Step 13

Now that mesh objects have achieved the right shape of a snake, we can proceed to light and shadow on the snake. Let’s start with the head, coloring the nodes of the mesh with the shades of gray, as shown below.

Nodes coloring at the junctions of the mesh should not be unlike, otherwise the seams will be visible. Lock all the mesh objects in the layers palette except for the object being edited. Now select one node at a time at the junction with the help of the Direct Selection Tool (A) and with the Eyedropper Tool (I) color the nodes in the colors of the neighboring areas.


Step 14

In my case, the light source is located to left of the snake. Therefore, the inner parts of the snake which are closer to the light source must be painted in lighter shades than the remote objects. To create a more realistic light and shadow, you can create new grid lines, using the Gradient Mesh Tool (U) in this work.


Step 15

Get to the creation of the scale. Take the Polygon Tool and create a hexagon of any size and color. With the Selection Tool (V) and holding down Opt / Alt slightly increase its width.

Keep the scale selected, go to Effect> Stylize> Round Corners … and set the radius of the rounding.

Now go to Object> Expand Appearance.


Step 16

With the Selection Tool (V) reduce the scale to the desired size, balancing its size with the size of the snake’s head.

Select the cell and go to Effect> Transform & Distort> Transform, now setting the parameters of the scale displacement in the dialog window (I have not done any calculations, but simply moved the sliders of the horizontal and vertical displacement, watching the result).

Click OK in the dialog box, now apply the effect again (Effect> Transform & Distort> Transform), but with new parameters.

And the last time Effect> Transform & Distort> Transform, select the number of copies in the dialog box so that the length of the scale was approximately equal to the length of the brush shape (length of the snake outline).

Keeping the scale selected, go to Object> Expand Appearance.


Step 17

Keeping the scale selected, go to Object> Transform> Rotate … and set the rotation angle of 90 degrees in the dialog box.

Fill the cells with red color, now create a set of horizontal rails, conventionally dividing the scale into equal parts, you do not need to be very accurate here.

Lock the guides in the Layers palette.


Step 18

With the Lasso Tool (Q) select the scales in the area of the horizontal guide, and replace the color of the fill with yellow.

Using the same tool select areas above and below the yellow scales and fill them with black.

Using this technique, recolor the pieces of the scale along its entire length.


Step 19

Select the shape of the brush and go to Object> Transform> Rotate … and set the rotation angle of 90 degrees in the dialog box. Make sure to include this shape in the underlayer above the scale.

Select scale and shape of the brush and go to Object> Envelope Distort> Make with Top Object. As a result the scale got the shape of the brush.


Step 20

Keeping the shape selected, go to Object> Transform> Rotate … and rotate it at -90 degrees in order to return it to horizontal view. Now drag the scale to the Brushes palette and save it as an Art Brush with the same parameters as in step 6.

Now unlock and make visible the contour of the snake that we saved in step 7. Select this path and apply the brush of scales.

If we applied the Art Brush, excluding the length of the path, we would have got stretched or compressed scales, which would not resemble the scales of snakes.


Step 21

Keeping the upper outline selected set the Multiply Blending Mode for it in the Transparency palette.


Step 22

In area of the snake body intersection we can see the scales overlapping each other. This defect must be fixed. Select the upper outline with scale and go to Object> Expand Appearance, now with the help of the Direction Tool (A) select the scales, which should not be visible, and delete them by pressing the Delete button.

Scales, which lie at the boundaries in the intersection of the snake body do not have to be removed. Select and group them up for convenience. Move the group of these scales in the layers palette so that it was located under the mesh object, which is supposed to lie above them.

After moving these scales set the Multiply Blending Mode for them again in the Transparency palette, as they were moved from the group that has these properties.


Step 23

Create glare on some scales. Select scales and fill them with linear gradient from the basic color to white one.


Step 24

Create snake eye. Take the Ellipse Tool (L) and create a circle. Fill the circle with radial gradient from black to black with 0% opacity. It will be a deepening of the eye in head of the snake.

Now create another circle – it will be the eye of the snake. Fill this circle with radial gradient from light brown to dark brown. Locate the center of the gradient according to the location of the light source will help of the Gradient Tool (G).

Create another circle filled with a solid light brown color – it’s the glare of light in the eye of the snake.


Step 25

Create shadows under the snake, using the same technique when creating snake body, described in 9-12 steps with the help of Mesh Tormentor.


Conclusion

I hope you enjoyed this tutorial. I think I still write a few more tutorials revealing other functions of the Mesh Tormentor.

Final Image
Credit to:

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final

Create a Neon Text Effect-Illustrator Tutorial

Final Image Preview

In this tutorial we will learn how to create a neon text effect using Gradient Mesh, 3D Modeling, Art Brushes and Transparency palette. Let’s begin!


Tutorial Details

  • Program: Adobe IllustratorCS-CS5;
  • Difficulty: Beginner
  • Estimated Completion Time: 15-20 minutes

Step 1

Create a neon text effect using the RGB color mode. If this mode is not set for your document, set it (File> Document Color Mode> RGB Color). Start by creating a background, take the Rectangle Tool (M) and create a rectangle with black fill.


Step 2

Keep the rectangle selected, go to Object> Create Gradient Mesh … and in the dialogue window set the number of rows and columns equal three.

Select central nodes of the gradient mesh using the Direct Selection Tool (A) and fill them with different colors, with the same tool, move the nodes as shown in the figure below.


Step 3

Proceed to the creation of the text. Take the Type Tool (T) and create a text, in my case this word is NEON. I used the Tahoma bold font. You can change the height and width of text using the Selection Tool (V).


Step 4

Keep the text selected, go to Effect> 3D> Extrude & Bevel and set effect parameters in the dialog window.

If after having applied the effect, there is a need in editing of the parameters, you can get the access to them from the menu of the Appearance palette.


Step 5

Lock 3D object in the Layers palette, later it will be used as a template. Now prepare shapes to create Art Brush. These shapes can be obtained through the transformation of the circle. The height of the first shape is 2 px, and the height of the second one is 1 px.

It is not necessary that you copy them exactly, they just have to be similar to these shapes. Fill these shapes with gray color. Now drag these shapes one at a time to the Brushes palette and save new brushes as Art Brushes.


Step 6

For convenience in the further work, change the template font color to dark gray, almost black, and lock it in the Layers palette again.

Using the Pen Tool (P) create dashes as shown in the figure below, basing on the template. Apply the first created brush to the dashes.

Apply similar technique to all the letters of the template.


Step 7

Now take the second brush created in step 5, take the Paint Brush Tool (B) and continue to outline the letters of the template. If you did not do well with brush stroke, you can undo the last action by pressing the keyboard combination of Cmd / Ctrl + Z or the edit line shape with the help of the Direct Selection Tool (A).


Step 8

Take the Pen Tool (P) and outline the front surfaces of the letters, there is no need in being very exact.

Now the template can be deleted.


Step 9

Select all the elements created by us, except for the background, and set the Color Dodge Blending mode for them in the Transparency palette.


Step 10

Create the light glares on the letters. Take the Ellipse Tool (L) and create a circle. Fill it with radial gradient from white to black color.

Now set the Color Dodge Blending mode for this shape in the Transparency palette.

Place such items in different places. Gradient of some elements can be replaced with black and gray.


Step 11

Now create a few similar elements, but after filling with radial gradient bring the circle to the shape of an ellipse using the Selection Tool (V).

Locate the elliptical elements as shown in the image below.

Final Image
Credit to:

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speaker00

Audio Speaker-Illustrator Tutorial

In the following steps I will show you how to create a nice audio speaker in Adobe Illustrator. You will only need a simple circle. Using the Appearance panel, seventeen fills, five stroke plus numerous effects you will reach the result shown in the image below. Give it a try and you might be impressed by the power of the Appearance panel.

Tutorial Details

  • Difficulty: Intermediate
  • Estimated Completion Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
  • Number of Steps: 20

This is What You’ll Be Creating

step00

Step 1

Create a 300 by 300, RGB document then pick the Ellipse Tool(L). Click on your artboard, enter 215 in the width and height boxes then click OK. This will create a 215 by 215px shape. Fill it with R=65 G=64 B=66 then open the fly-out menu of the Appearance panel and click on Add New Fill. This will add a second fill for your shape. Select it from the Appearance panel and make it black. Return to the first fill, select it and go to Effect > Stylize > Inner Glow. Enter the data shown below, click OK then move to the second fill. First, lower its opacity to 5% then go to Effect > Artistic > Film Grain. Enter the data shown and click OK. Now, your shape should look like in the image below.

step1

Step 2

Add a third fill for your shape. Select it from the Appearance panel, move it below the existing fills and use the linear gradient shown below. The white numbers from the gradient image stands for Location percentage. With this fill selected go to Effect > Distort&Transform > Transform. Drag the Scale-Horizontal and the Scale-Vertical sliders to 115%, click OK then go to Effect > Stylize > Inner Glow. Enter the data shown in the following image then click OK.

step2

Step 3

Select the fill made in the previous step and click on the Duplicate Selected Item button from the bottom of the Appearance panel. Obviously, this will duplicate the fill made in the previous step. Select this copy, remove the Inner Glow effect then lower its opacity to 25% and change the blending mode to Overlay. Next, you will need a nice pattern for this fill. Open the fly-out menu of the Swatches panel and go to Open Swatch Library > Pattern > Basic Graphics > Basic Graphics_Textures. A new window with a group of cool patterns should open. Make sure that the newest fill is selected and click on the USGS 21 Intraticate Surface pattern. Now, your shape should look like in the image below.

step3

Step 4

Add a new fill for your shape and make sure that it is placed in the top of the Appearance panel, above all other fills. Select it, use the linear gradient shown below then go to Effect > Distort&Transform > Transform. Drag the Scale-Horizontal and the Scale-Vertical sliders to 83% and click OK.

step4

Step 5

Duplicate the fill made in the previous step. Select this new fill. Replace the exiting gradient with the one shown in the following image then open the Transform effect (from the Appearance panel) and drag the slider to 82,5%.

step5

Step 6

Again, duplicate the fill made in the previous step. Select this new fill, replace the linear gradient with the color shown below (R=35 G=35 B=40) then open the Transform effect and drag the sliders to 79%.

step6

Step 7

Once again, duplicate the fill made in the previous step. Select this new fill, replace the color with the linear gradient shown below then open the Transform effect and drag the sliders to 76%.

step7

Step 8

One more time, duplicate the fill made in the previous step. Select this copy, replace the gradient with the color shown below (R=40 G=40 B=40) then open the Transform effect and drag the sliders to 74%.

step8

Step 9

One last time, duplicate the fill made in the previous step. Select this fresh fill, set its color at R=65 G=64 B=66 then open the Transform effect. Drag the sliders to 70%, click OK then go to Effect > Stylize > Inner Glow and enter the data shown below.

step9

Step 10

Make two copies of the fill made in the previous step. Select each of these new fills, remove the Inner Glow effect then use the radial gradient shown below. The yellow aero from the gradient image stands for Opacity percentage.

step10

Step 11

Duplicate one of the fills made in the previous step. Select this new fill, replace the gradient with the USGS 7 Vineyard pattern then duplicate it. Select this new fill, lower its opacity to 15% and replace the pattern with the color shown below (R=35 G=31 B=32).

step11

Step 12

Duplicate the first fill made in the previous step (the one with the pattern). Select this new fill, move it in the top of the Appearance panel, replace the pattern with the color shown in the following image (R=40 G=40 B=40) then open the Transform effect and drag the sliders at 20%.

step12

Step 13

Again, duplicate the fill made in the previous step. Select this fresh fill, replace the color with the linear gradient shown below then open the Transform effect and drag the sliders at 16%.

step13

Step 14

Once again, duplicate the fill made in the previous step. As usual, open the Transform effect and drag the sliders to 15% then replace the existing gradient with the one shown in the following image.

step14

Step 15

Now, it’s time to add some strokes. Add a 0.5pt, white stroke. Lower its opacity to 30% then open the Stroke panel (Window > Stroke) and click on the Align to Outside button.

step15

Step 16

Select your shape, open the fly-out menu of the Appearance panel and click on Add New Stroke. This will add a new stroke for your shapes. Select it and set the color at R=128 G=130 B=133. Align it to outside, lower its opacity to 50% then go to Effect > Distort&Transform > Transform. Enter 100,5 in the Scale-Horizontal and Scale-Vertical boxes then click OK. Select this fresh stroke and click on the Duplicate Selected Item button from the bottom of the Appearance panel. Obviously, this will create a copy of the selected stroke. Select it, raise its opacity to 100%, set the color at R=147 G=149 B=152 then open the Transform effect and drag the sliders to 114%.

step16

Step 17

Duplicate the last stroke made in the previous step. Select this fresh stroke and make it 6pt wide. Set the color at R=65 G=64 B=66 then open the Transform effect and drag the sliders at 104%. Next, open the Stroke panel. Click on the Round Cap and Align to Outside buttons then check the Dashed Line box and enter 0 in the dash box and 113 in the gap box. With this stroke still selected add the Inner Glow (Effect > Stylize > Inner Glow) and the Drop Shadow (Effect > Stylize > Drop Shadow) effects shown below.

step17

Step 18

Duplicate the stroke made in the previous step. Select this new stroke. Remove the Inner Glow and the Drop Shadow effect then go to the Stroke panel. Enter 0,5 in the dash box and 112,5 in the gap box. Now, it should look like in the image below.

step18

Step 19

Reselect the entire path and go to Effect > Stylize > Drop Shadow. Enter the data shown below then click OK.

step19

Step 20

Finally you can replace the steel frame with a wooden one. All you need to do is replace some patterns, colors and effects as shown in the following image.

step20

Conclusion

Now your work is done. Here is how it should look like.

step00

Credit to:

http://vforvectors.com

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abstract-design-sm

Cool Abstract Radial Pattern Design-Illustrator Tutorial

The design we’ll be creating this time makes use of a radial pattern that draws in the viewer to the centre. Alternating colours give the design a cool and funky feel and textures add a touch of authenticity to the artwork.

Create a new document in Adobe Illustrator at the dimensions of your preference and draw a rectangle across the whole artboard.

Toggle on Smart Guides (CMD+U) and draw a small circle from the centre of the rectangle. Copy and paste this circle and scale it larger than the artboard itself. With both selected go to Object > Blend > Make.

Go back to Object > Blend > Blend Options and adjust the settings to Specified Steps with a count of 8.

Draw a line from the centre of the document, then with the Pen tool add a point at the halfway point. Use the Convert Anchor Point tool to drag bezier handles from the point to give a smooth curve.

Select the Rotate tool and ALT-click a pivot point in the centre of the document. In the options box enter 18 degrees and press the Copy button.

Repeatedly press the shortcut CMD+D to repeat the transformation until you have a series of 20 lines spaced evenly around the circle.

Select the concentric circles and go to Object > Expand. Select the Object checkbox to convert this blend into editable paths.

Draw a selection across all objects, then Shift-click the background rectangle to deselect it. Create a Compound Path (CMD+8) then with both the compound path and background rectangle selected, click the Divide option from the Pathfinder palette.

Right click and Ungroup, then delete out the excess linework beyond the edges of the artboard. Elsewhere on the document set up some gradient colour swatches for use in your design. Here I’m using grey, blue and green each with changes in tone from light to dark.

Hold Shift while selecting alternating shapes in the inner portion of the radial pattern. Give these shapes the grey gradient fill with the eyedropper tool.

On the next and subsequent rows select alternating shapes to create a chequerboard style pattern. Continue until you’ve filled the whole design.

Use the green gradient to fill the leftover shapes in the centre area of the pattern, then switch to blue for the next row.

Alternate between blue and green fills until the whole design is filled with gradient colours.

Currently all the gradients are flowing in the same direction. Manually select each shape in turn and adjust the gradient angle with the Gradient tool.

After a lot of clicking and dragging all the gradients will follow the same radial path, which gives the design a much more dynamic feeling.

The vector work is complete, but let’s switch over to Photoshop to give the design a more tactile feel. Paste the design into a large PSD, then import a cool grunge texture.

Change the blending mode of the texture to Overlay to allow the texture and colours to interact with the vector pattern.

Switch back to Illustrator and clear out the fills from all the objects, then add a white stroke. Copy and paste this graphic into the Photoshop document.

Go to Filter > Blur > Gaussian Blur and enter around 3px to take the harsh edge off the white strokes.

Change the blending mode to Overlay at 50%, then dab a few spots of black with a large soft brush on a layer mask to adjust the impact of these glowing lines.

Add a soft spot of white in the centre of the design and change the blending mode to Overlay to finish off the design with a vibrant highlight.

View the abstract radial design

Credit to:

http://www.blog.spoongraphics.co.uk

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light_bulb_preview

Semi-Realistic Light Bulb-Adobe Illustrator Tutorial

In this Illustrator tutorial, you will learn how to draw a light bulb illustration. Most of the time, we’ll be using the Pen Tool, so this is great practice for those struggling with drawing freehand. A light bulb is a complex object that contains many small parts and details, and we will try our best to draw them all, in order to create as close to an accurate portrayal as possible.

Preview

Tutorial Resources

Step 1: Create a New Illustrator Document

First, let’s set up our artboard. Create a new Illustrator document that’s 500×500px in size.

Step 2: Import a Reference Photo

I used a light bulb I had at home as a reference photo; I’ve provided it to you for this tutorial. Download this light bulb image and open it in Illustrator. Lock the layer of the photo to avoid accidentally moving it.

Step 3: Draw the Light Bulb’s Outline

Create a new layer above the reference photo; the new layer is where we’ll draw our illustration.

To start, we’ll draw the outline of the light bulb. Grab the Pen Tool (P) and trace the left side of the light bulb.

Switch to the Selection Tool (V) then click on the path we have just created to select it. Go to Object > Transform > Reflect. Select the Vertical option and then hit the Copy button. This will create a mirror image.

Hold down Shift, click on the reflected path, and then drag it to the right; we have to hold down Shift so that movement is constrained horizontally.

Grab the Direct Selection Tool (A) and select just the upper anchor points of both the left and right paths. Right-click on one of them and then choose Join from the contextual menu that appears to combine both anchors.

To join the lower anchor points, just grab the Pen Tool (P) and click on each anchor point to close the outline’s vector path.

Step 4: Draw the Screw Cap’s Shape

Next, we’ll create the lower part of the light bulb (the metallic part) which is commonly called the screw cap.

Select the Pen Tool (P) and start to draw the top part of the screw cap where it meets with the bulb.

The middle part of the screw cap is a little bit tricky to draw. But it doesn’t need to be perfect, just try to follow the shape of the cap and do your best. Make sure to draw smooth lines and curves, and don’t worry if you can’t draw it nicely the first time around; you can always adjust and tweak individual anchor points using the Direct Selection Tool.

Keep drawing until you have all the main parts of the metal cap.

Step 5: Draw the Threads on the Screw Cap

Now we need to make the screw cap’s threads. Select the Rounded Rectangle Tool and then create the rectangle shown below.

We need to distort it a little bit. Select the rectangle then go to Object > Envelope Distort > Make with Warp.

In the Warp Options dialog window, choose Arc for the Style option, choose the Horizontal option, and set the value for Bend to -9. This will bend the rectangle exactly in half.

With the Direct Selection Tool (A), select four anchor points at the middle of the rectangle by holding Shift and clicking on each of the anchor points. When the anchor points are selected, use the Left Arrow key to nudge the anchors a few pixels to the left. It will distort the rectangle a bit more, which will contribute to the realistic look.

Switch to the Selection Tool (V) and click on the rectangle to select it, then expand it by choosing Object > Expand. Afterwards, move it on the metal cap of the light bulb.

Duplicate it several times and place the duplicates as shown below.

More or less, this is the basic shape of the metal cap:

Step 6: Applying Gradients to the Screw Cap

With nice metal color gradients, we can make the lower part of light bulb more persuading. It will also help us create some depth in this illustration.

To apply gradients, go to Window > Gradient (Ctrl/Cmd + F9) to open the Gradient Panel.

For the threads, apply the gradient shown below.

For the electrical contact, we’ll use a simple radial gradient.

Continue using metallic gradients until you reach the desired look.

Step 7: Creating Metallic Highlights

Let’s highlight some edges. It will improve the metallic look of the screw cap. Select the upper part of the cap and duplicate it two times by copying (Ctrl/Cmd + C) and then pasting in front (Ctrl/Cmd + F) twice. You should know have three copies; the original plus two duplicates. Nudge one of the duplicates 2px upwards and scale it up a little bit. Then select both copies and, under the Pathfinder Panel, press the Minus Front button.

Apply the linear gradient shown below.

Do the same thing for the lower part of the cap.

Step 8: Create the Inner Components of the Light Bulb

In this step, we’ll use our reference photo to create the elements inside the glass part of the light bulb.

To start, just grab the Pen Tool (P) and start drawing. A tip: Just follow the shape of the object you’re drawing; it doesn’t need to be perfect because we can adjust individual anchor points in case we don’t like how it looks. As a reference while you’re drawing, follow along in the progression below.

To create the coiled tungsten filament — the curly wire that goes across in the middle — select the path we drew at the top and then go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Zig Zag. Set the Size to 1.5pt, Ridges per Segment to 20, Points to Smooth.

Without the light bulb reference photo, our illustration should look like this:

We’re moving along quite nicely, wouldn’t you say?

Step 9: Apply Colors to the Glass Part of the Light bulb

Our light bulb looks flat and it certainly needs some color. Let’s apply a nice blue gradient and see what we get.

First, we’ll create a white outline for the glass of the light bulb. Select the glass and then choose Object > Path > Offset Path. Set the Offset to -3.

Select the inner shape of the glass and then duplicate it.

Set the Stroke color of the larger shape to a light gray (#C2C4C6) and the Stroke color of the smaller shape to white (#FFFFF). Select them both and go to Object > Blend > Make.

Now, select the other copy of the smaller shape and set the Fill color to a light blue (#ADE0ED).

Grab the Ellipse Tool (L) and create a circle at the middle of the glass. Give the circle a nice blue-to-white radial gradient.

Step 10: Applying Reflections and Shadows

We are almost done! All we need to do is to create some nice reflections and shadows (it is a light bulb, after all!) Reflections can be various shapes and forms, but the best way to make them is to follow the shape of the object.

Select the blue shape of the light bulb and create two copies. Move one of the copies, then rotate it a bit. Select both copies and, under the Pathfinder Panel, hit the Minus Front button.

Select the resultant shape and scale it down a bit. Apply the radial gradient shown below.

Let’s do the same thing, but on the other side of the light bulb. Create two copies of the blue shape again, move one of the copies a little bit, rotate it, scale it up or down (feel free to be creative and follow your instincts). This way, you can mimic the non-uniformity of reflections in the real world. When you’re satisfied, hit the Minus Front button in the Pathfinder Panel to create the reflection.

Select the reflection object and give it a radial gradient.


Using the same technique, create a few more interesting reflections.

We should do the same with the inner components of the light bulb. Each time you want to create a reflection, use the same technique: duplicate the object twice, move one of the copies, rotate, scale it up or down and when you’re happy with the shape of the reflection, hit the Minus Front, Unite, or Intersect button in the Pathfinder Panel depending on what you’re trying to achieve.

The more details we focus on, the more compelling and realistic our illustration will be. Just make sure not to exaggerate; we don’t want to create a busy, overcrowded and unfocused illustration.

When you’re done creating reflections and details, adjust the position and size of all the elements in order to complete the light bulb illustration.

Also, don’t forget to create the shadow.

Tutorial Summary

In this tutorial, we used the Pen Tool quite a lot. The Pen Tool is really a powerful Adobe Illustrator feature, but it requires practice to master. Also, I showed you a popular technique that many illustrators do, which is to use a reference photo for helping us draw our illustrations. It’s much easier when you have a reference image that you can use for tracing. I hope you liked this tutorial and thank you for following along!

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00

Create an On and Off Button-Illustrator Tutorial

In the following tutorial you will learn to create an on/off button. It’s simple to create and you will learn how to make an object that’s perfect as a web element or icon. Let’s get started!

 


Step 1

Create a 200 by 200px, RGB document. Turn on the Grid (View > Grid) and the Snap to Grid (View > Snap to Grid). Next, you’ll need a grid every 5px. Go to Edit > Preferences > Guides & Grid, enter 5 in the Gridline every box and 1 in the Subdivisions box. You can also open the Info panel (Window > Info) for a live preview with the size and position of your shapes. Do not forget to replace the unit of measurement to pixels from Edit > Preferences > Unit > General. Al these options will significantly increase your work speed.


Step 2

Pick the Rectangle Tool (M), create a 90 by 140px shape and fill it with R=65 G=64 B=66. Open the Appearance panel (Window > Appearance), select the fill and go to Effect > Stylize > Inner Glow. Enter the data shown below then click OK.


Step 3

Select the shape made in the previous step, ope the fly-out menu of the Appearance panel and click on Add New Fill. This will add a second fill for your shape. Select it, set its color to R=20 G=20 B=20 then go to Effect > Distort&Transform > Transform. Enter the data shown below image #1 click OK then go to Effect > Warp > Arc Lower. Enter the data shown below image #2, click OK then go to Effect > Blur > Gaussian Blur. Enter a 1px radius and click OK. Make sure that this new fill is still selected, lower its opacity to 70% then move it below the first fill (in the Appearance panel).


Step 4

Add a third fill for your rectangle. Select it, lower its opacity to 15%, change the blending mode to Multiply then go to Effect > Artistic > Film Grain. Enter the data shown below then click OK.


Step 5

Reselect the rectangle and add a first stroke. Make it 0.5pt wide, align it to inside and set its color at R=20 G=20 B=20. Select it from the Appearance panel and click on Duplicate Selected Item icon from the bottom of the Appearance panel. This will duplicate the stroke. Select this copy, set its color at R=109 G=110 B=113 then go to Effect > Distort&Transform > Transform. Enter the data shown below then click OK.


Step 6

Reselect the entire rectangle and go to Effect > Stylize > Rounded Corners. Enter and 5px radius then click OK. Now you shape should look like in the following image.


Step 7

Pick the Ellipse Tool (L), create a 5 by 5px shape and place it as shown in the following image. The Snap to Grid will ease your work. Fill it with R=88 G=89 B=91 then select the fill and go to Effect > Stylize > Drop Shadow. Enter the data shown below then click OK.


Step 8

Reselect the shape made in the previous step and add a second fill. Select it, set its color to R=20 G=20 B=20 and go to Effect > Distort&Transform > Transform. Enter the data shown below, click OK then go to Effect > Distort&Transform > Pucker&Bloat. Again, enter the data shown below and click OK.


Step 9

Next, you need to add a copy of this circle in every corner. You can create three copies and move them in the corners, or you can select the circle and add the two Transform effects shown below.


Step 10

Select the rounded rectangle and go to Object > Path > Offset Path. Enter a -20px Offset and click OK. The resulting shape should look like in the second image. Select it and hit D to add the default properties (white fill and black stroke). Now your shape should look like in the third image. Reselect it, align the stroke to outside, set the color at R=10 G=10 B=10 for both fill and stroke then go to Effect > Stylize > Rounded Corners. Enter a 5px radius and click OK. In the end your shape should look like in the fourth image.


Step 11

Select the shape made in the previous step and make a copy in front (Control + C > Control + F). Select this copy, remove the stroke, set the fill color at R=255 G=255 B=255 then go to Object > Expand Appearance.


Step 12

Pick the Pen Tool (P) and draw a 60px horizontal path. Add a thin, red stroke so that you can distinguish it easier from the rest of the shapes. Select it along with the white shape created in the previous step and open the Align panel. Pick the Selection Tool (V), click on the border of the white shape (it should get emphasized) then click on the Horizontal Align Center and Vertical Align center button from the Align panel. Now, your horizontal path should be laced as shown in the third image. Reselect it along with the white, rounded rectangle and click on the Divide button from the Pathfinder panel. This will divide your white shape in two equal shapes.


Step 13

Select the group created in the previous step and hit Shift + Control + G to ungroup it. Now, let’s focus on the bottom shapes. Select it, fill it with R=75 G=75 B=75 then add a second fill and use the linear gradient shown below image #2. The yellow zero from the gradient image stands for opacity percentage.


Step 14

Unable the Snap to Grid then go to Edit > Preferences > General. Enter 0.5 in the Keyboard Increment box then click OK. Reselect the shape edited in the previous step and make two copies in front (Control + C > Control + F > Control + F). Select the top copy and hit the up arrow (to move it 0.5px up). Reselect both copies and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel. Fill the resulting shape with R=147 G=149 B=152.


Step 15

Now, let’s move to the top shape. Select it and go to Effect > 3D > Extrude&Bevel. Enter the data shown below, click OK then go to Object > Expand Appearance. Take a look in your Layers panel and you’ll find a fresh group. Open it and remove the two Clipping paths.


Step 16

Select the shapes highlighted in the first image and click on the Unite button from the Pathfinder panel. Fill the resulting shape with the linear gradient shown in the second image.


Step 17

Enable the Snap to Grid and pick the Direct Selection Tool (A). Select the anchor points highlighted in the first image and move them down as shown in the second image. Once again, the snap to grid will ease your work. Fill this shape with R=65 G=64 B=66 the add a second fill and use the gradient shown in the fourth image.


Step 18

Disable the Snap to Grid then select the shape edited in the previous step and make two copies in front (Control + C > Control + F > Control + F). Select the top copy and hit the down arrow. Reselect both copies and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel. Fill the resulting shape with R=128 G=130 B=133 and lower its opacity to 85%.


Step 19

Finally, if you choose to rotate your button 90 degrees it will look like in the first image. To fix the shadow select the large rounded rectangle, go to the bottom fill, open the Transform effect and replace the existing data with the one shown in the second image. Do the same if you chose to use the Transform effect to multiply the screws.

Credit to:

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HowtoCreateanIcecoldPosterwith3DText

50 Useful Poster Designing Tutorials

A poster is any piece of printed paper which typically includes both textual and graphic elements. Although a poster may be either wholly graphical or wholly text; they are mainly designed to convey information and message. They are a frequent tool of advertisers; particularly of events, musicians and films. If you are short of ideas on how to create a poster then you got to look at the poster designing tutorial I have collected today. I am sure these will help you in making your next poster designing more professional. Enjoy!

 

1. How to Design a Geometric Poster in Photoshop

Poster Designing Tutorials

2. How to Make a High-Impact Fashion Poster in Photoshop

Poster Designing Tutorials

3. How To Create Your Own Fiery Ring Poster in Photoshop

Poster Designing Tutorials

4. How to Create an Intense Movie Poster in Photoshop

Poster Designing Tutorials

5. Design a Grunge Vintage Poster in Photoshop

Poster Designing Tutorials

6. How to create a Ying Yang Inspired Poster in Photoshop

Poster Designing Tutorials

7. Design a Horror Looking, Extreme Grungy Style Poster in Photoshop

Poster Designing Tutorials

8. Create a Futuristic Portrait Poster in Photoshop

Poster Designing Tutorials

9. Create a Fun Horror Movie Poster Design in Photoshop

Poster Designing Tutorials

10. Create a Vibrant Space-themed Poster in Photoshop

Poster Designing Tutorials

11. Create a Pop Art Style Poster with Urban City Background in Photoshop

Poster Designing Tutorials

12. Create an Abstract Light Streaks poster in Photoshop CS5

Poster Designing Tutorials

13. Design a Stylish Poster mixed with displacement effect in Photoshop CS5

Poster Designing Tutorials

14. How to create a dynamic nature poster in Photoshop

Poster Designing Tutorials

15. Gigposter Design: The New Sex

Poster Designing Tutorials

16. Your Own Crazy Movie Poster

Poster Designing Tutorials

17. Create abstract poster effects

Poster Designing Tutorials

18. Designing a war movie poster

Poster Designing Tutorials

19. Create a Vintage Art Deco Poster with Illustrator’s Grain Effect

Poster Designing Tutorials

20. Create an Inspirational Vector Political Poster

Poster Designing Tutorials

21. Soul Rebel Poster Tutorial

Poster Designing Tutorials

22. How to Create an Ice-cold Poster with 3D Text

Poster Designing Tutorials

23. Make an Inspiring Artistic Poster with Drawn Elements

Poster Designing Tutorials

24. Create a Furious Pink Panther Poster

Poster Designing Tutorials

25. Design a Creepy Gothic Poster

Poster Designing Tutorials

26. Create a Stylish Club Poster

Poster Designing Tutorials

27. Design A Killer Fashion Model Poster

Poster Designing Tutorials

28. Retro Modernist Poster Design with 3D Typography

Poster Designing Tutorials

29. Design an Epic Fantasy Scene with Photoshop

Poster Designing Tutorials

30. Design a Retro Styled Poster

Poster Designing Tutorials

31. Design a Colorful Illustration Using Patterns and Shapes

Poster Designing Tutorials

32. Create an Awesome Music Poster

Poster Designing Tutorials

33. Creating the Spoiled Princess Fashion Poster

Poster Designing Tutorials

34. Creating a Grunge Rock Poster

Poster Designing Tutorials

35. Create a Retro Metal Text poster in Photoshop

Poster Designing Tutorials

36. Design a Contemporary Poster

Poster Designing Tutorials

37. Create and Then Shatter a Grid, while Making a Typographic Poster

Poster Designing Tutorials

38. Blend and Mask Yourself a Great Poster

Poster Designing Tutorials

39. Inception Poster with Repousse in Photoshop CS5

Poster Designing Tutorials

40. Design a Grungy, Rock & Roll Gig Poster

Poster Designing Tutorials

41. Design a Vintage Style Swissair Travel Poster In Photoshop

Poster Designing Tutorials

42. Create a Stylish Grunge Poster with 3D Typography in Photoshop

Poster Designing Tutorials

43. Create a Cosmic Sci-fi Poster Design in Photoshop

Poster Designing Tutorials

44. Create a Refreshing Beer Themed Poster Design in Photoshop

Poster Designing Tutorials

45. Design a High Impact Gig Poster Suitable for Screen-Printing

Poster Designing Tutorials

46. Create a Hellboy Poster in Illustrator

Poster Designing Tutorials

47. How To Create The Expendables Winged Skull Poster Art

Poster Designing Tutorials

48. Create a Funky Perspective of a Model Riding Digital Volume

Poster Designing Tutorials

49. Create a retro grunge typographic poster in Photoshop

Poster Designing Tutorials

50. Awesome Colorful Poster Tutorial

Poster Designing Tutorials

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00

3D Cube With Embossed Letters On Each Side-Illustrator tutorial

In this week’s tutorial I will show you how to create a nice cube with some embossed letters on each side. First, you’ll learn to create some simple symbols then using the 3D Extrude&Bevel effect you’ll create the rough cube shape. Next, using basic tools, effect and options you will reach the final result.

This is what you’ll be creating:

preview

Step 01

Create a 700 by 700px, RGB document and grab the Type Tool(T). Click on your artboard and add the “ABC”. Use the Calibri font with a size of 400pt, make it Bold then go to Object > Expand. Next, you need to turn each letter shape into a symbol. First, open the Symbols panel. Select the “A” shape, open the fly-out menu of the Symbols panel and click on New Symbol. Name it “A” and click OK. Repeat the same techniques for the other two shapes. In the end you must have three symbols in your Symbols panel.

Step 02

Pick the Rectangle Tool(M) and click on your artboard. Enter 350 in the width and height boxes then click OK. Fill this new shape with R=147 G=149 B=152.

Step 03

Select the shape created in the previous step and go to Effect > 3D > Extrude&Bevel. Click on the More Options button then enter the numbers shown in the following image. Do not forget to check the Draw Hidden Faces box.

Step 04

Reselect the cube created in the previous step, open the 3D effect from the Appearance panel and click on the Map Art button. Go to “Surface 1″, select the “A” from the Symbol drop down menu and rotate it as shown in the following image. Continue with “Surface 5″, select the “B” from the Symbol drop down menu and rotate it as shown in the following image. Finally, go to “Surface 6″, select the “C” from the Symbol drop down menu and rotate it as shown below.

Step 05

Reselect the cube and go to Object > Expand Appearance. This will create a group containing a bunch of other subgroups. Go to the Layers panel, hold Alt and click on the little arrow icon to expand the entire group. Delete the two, bottom subgroups and the Clipping Paths. Reselect the entire group and and hit Shift + Control + G four times to get rid of all these groups and subgroups. Finally, double click on each of these shapes and rename them as shown in the following image. It will be easier for you to find them in the further steps.

Step 06

Go to Edit > Preferences > General and enter 2.5px in the Keyboard Increment box. Duplicate the letter shapes. Select these copies, move them in the bottom of the Layers panel and make them invisible. You’ll need them later. Select the A shape and make a copy in front (Control + C > Control + F). Fill it with white then hit the up arrow four times. Move to the B shape. Make a copy in front, fill it with white then hit the right arrow four times and the down arrow three times. Finally, duplicate the C shape. Make it white then hit the down arrow three times and the left arrow four times.

Step 07

Let’s improve the embossed look of our letters. First, enable the Smart Guides (Control + U) to ease your work then Pick the Pen Tool(P) and draw some simple paths as shown in the second image.

Step 08

Duplicate the white A shape (Control + C > Control + F). Select the shapes created in the previous step along with the black A shape and click on the Unite button from the Pathfinder panel. Select the resulting shape along with the fresh, white copy and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel. You will get a group with three black shape.

Step 09

Continue with the C shape. Again, pick the Pen Tool(P) and draw some simple paths as shown in the following image.

Step 10

Duplicate the white C shape (Control + C > Control + F). Select the shapes created in the previous step along with the black, C shape and click on the Unite button from the Pathfinder panel. Select the resulting shape along with the fresh, white copy and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel. You will get a group with two black shape.

Step 11

Move to the B shape. Once gain, pick the Pen Tool(P) and draw some simple paths as shown in the following image.

Step 12

Duplicate the white B shape (Control + C > Control + F). Select the shapes created in the previous step along with the black, B shape and click on the Unite button from the Pathfinder panel. Select the resulting shape along with the fresh, white copy and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel. You will get a group with four black shape.

Step 13

Let’s add some color. Select “A Side”, fill it with R=57 G=181 B=74 then go to the Appearance panel. Open the fly-out menu and click on Add New Fill. This will add a second fill for your shape. Select it and use the linear gradient shown below. The yellow zero from the gradient image stands for opacity percentage. Add a third fill for this shape and make it black. Select it from the Appearance panel, lower its opacity to 5%, set the blending mode to Multiply then go to Effect > Artistic > Film Grain. Enter the data shown below then click OK.

Step 14

Take a closer look at this green shape and you’ll notice that the edges are a bit pixelated. It’s because of the Film Grain effect. Open the Transparency panel then select “A Side” and make a copy in front (Control + C > Control + F). Select it and hit D to add the default properties (white fill and black stroke). Remove the stroke then select the white shape along with the original, green shape. Go to the Transparency panel, open the fly-out menu and click on Make Opacity Mask. Now, the pixelated edges are gone.

Step 15

Go to Edit > Preferences > General and enter 1px in the Keyboard Increment box. Select the masked shape created in the previous step and make two copies (Control + C > Control + F > Control + F). Select the top copy and hit the up arrow once. Reselect both copies and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel. Fill the resulting shape with R=141 G=198 B=63 and set its blending mode to Overlay. Pick the Delete Anchor Point Tool(-), focus on the zoomed areas from the third image and click on the highlighted anchor points to remove them.

Step 16

Select “B Side”, fill it with R=65 G=64 B=66 then go to the Appearance panel. Open the fly-out menu and add a second fill for your shape. Select it and use the linear gradient shown below. Add a third fill for this shape and make it black. Select it from the Appearance panel, lower its opacity to 5%, set the blending mode to Multiply thne go to Effect > Artistic > Film Grain. Enter the data shown below then click OK.

Step 17

Again, let’s get rid of these pixelated edges. Select “B Side” and make a copy in front (Control + C > Control + F). Select it and hit D. Remove the stroke then select the white shape along with the original, grey shape. Go to the Transparency panel, open the fly-out menu and click on Make Opacity Mask.

Step 18

Select the masked shape created in the previous step and make two copies (Control + C > Control + F > Control + F). Select the top copy then hit the right arrow and the down arrow. Reselect both copies and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel. Fill the resulting shape with R=209 G=211 B=212 and set its blending mode to Multiply. Pick the Delete Anchor Point Tool(-), focus on the zoomed areas from the second image and remove the highlighted anchor points.

Step 19

Select “C Side”, fill it with R=35 G=31 B=32 then go to the Appearance panel. Open the fly-out menu and add a second fill for your shape. Select it and use the linear gradient shown below. Add a third fill for this shape and set its color to R=35 G=31 B=32. Select it from the Appearance panel, lower its opacity to 10%, set the blending mode to Multiply then go to Effect > Artistic > Film Grain. Enter the data shown below then click OK.

Step 20

Once again, let’s get rid of these pixelated edges. Select “C Side” and make a copy in front (Control + C > Control + F). Select it and hit D. Remove the stroke then select the white shape along with the original, grey shape. Go to the Transparency panel, open the fly-out menu and click on Make Opacity Mask.

Step 21

Select the masked shape created in the previous step and make two copies (Control + C > Control + F > Control + F). Select the top copy then hit the left arrow and the down arrow. Reselect both copies and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel. Fill the resulting shape with R=230 G=231 B=232 and set its blending mode to Multiply. Pick the Delete Anchor Point Tool(-), focus on the zoomed areas from the second image and remove the highlighted anchor points.

Step 22

Go to Edit > Preferences > General and enter 1px in the Keyboard Increment box. Turn the “A” copy (made in the the sixth step) back to visible. Move it below the other letter components (in the Layers panel) then hit the down arrow once. Fill it with R=0 G=104 B=56, lower its opacity to 50%, set the blending mode to Multiply then go to Effect > Blur > Gaussian Blur. Enter a 1.5px radius then click OK.

Step 23

Keep focusing on the “A”. Select the three shapes group. Fill them with R=40 G=40 B=40 then create the two gradients shown below and save them into yout Swatches panel. Reselect each of these shapes add some new fills and use saved gradients as shown in the second image.

Step 24

Create two new gradients, save them into your swatches panel then use them as shown in the following images.

Step 25

Select the top “A” path and fill it with R=65 G=64 B=66. Add a second fill for this shape and use the linear gradient shown below. Add a third fill for this shape and make it black. Select it from the Appearance panel, lower its opacity to 5%, set the blending mode to Multiply then go to Effect > Artistic > Film Grain. Enter the data shown below then click OK.

Step 26

Go to Edit > Preferences > General and enter 0.5px in the Keyboard Increment box. Select the shape edited in the previous step and make two copies (Control + C > Control + F > Control + F). Select the top copy and hit the up arrow once. Reselect both copies and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel. Fill the resulting group of shapes only with R=117 G=119 B=122.

Step 27

Go to Edit > Preferences > General and enter 1px in the Keyboard Increment box. Turn the “B” copy (made in the the sixth step) back to visible. Move it below the other letter components (in the Layers panel) then hit the left arrow and the up arrow twice. Fill it with R=35 G=31 B=32, lower its opacity to 20%, set the blending mode to Multiply then go to Effect > Blur > Gaussian Blur. Enter a 1.5px radius then click OK.

Step 28

Keep focusing on the “B”. Select the four shapes group. Fill them with R=0 G=104 B=56 then create the two gradients shown below and save them into your Swatches panel. Reselect each of these four shapes, add some new fills and use the saved gradients as shown in the second image.

Step 29

Create a seventh gradient, save it into your swatches panel and use it as shown in the following image. Select each of these three new fills and lower their opacity to 70%.

Step 30

Select the top “B” path and fill it with R=0 G=161 B=75. Add a second fill for this shape and use the linear gradient shown below. Add a third fill for this shape and make it black. Select it from the Appearance panel, lower its opacity to 3%, set the blending mode to Multiply then go to Effect > Artistic > Film Grain. Enter the data shown below then click OK.

Step 31

Go to Edit > Preferences > General and enter 0.5px in the Keyboard Increment box. Select the shape edited in the previous step and make two copies (Control + C > Control + F > Control + F). Select the top copy then hit the down arrow and the right arrow once. Reselect both copies and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel. Fill the resulting group of shapes with R=106 G=189 B=66.

Step 32

Go to Edit > Preferences > General and enter 1px in the Keyboard Increment box. Turn the “C” copy (made in the the sixth step) back to visible. Move it below the other letter components (in the Layers panel) then hit the right arrow twice. Fill it with R=35 G=31 B=32, lower its opacity to 20%, set the blending mode to Multiply then go to Effect > Blur > Gaussian Blur. Enter a 1.5px radius then click OK.

Step 33

Keep focusing on the “C”. Select the two shapes group. Fill them with R=0 G=104 B=56 then add some new fills and use Gradients 5, 6 and 7 as shown in the following images. Folllowing the data shown below create one final gradient then use is as shown in the third image. Don’t forget to lower the opacity to 70% for the fills with Gradient7 and Gradient8.

Step 34

Select the top “C” path and fill it with R=0 G=161 B=75. Add two new fills for this shape and use the linear gradients shown below. Add a fourth fill for this shape and make it black. Select it from the Appearance panel, lower its opacity to 3%, set the blending mode to Multiply then go to Effect > Artistic > Film Grain. Enter the data shown below then click OK.

Step 35

Go to Edit > Preferences > General and enter 0.5px in the Keyboard Increment box. Select the shape edited in the previous step and make two copies (Control + C > Control + F > Control + F). Select the top copy then hit the down arrow and the left arrow once. Reselect both copies and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel. Fill the resulting group of shapes with R=106 G=189 B=66.

Step 36

Finally, select “Shadow”, fill it with R=25 G=25 B=25 and go to Effect > Blur > Gaussian Blur. Enter a 3.5 radius, click OK then go to Object > Path > Offset Path. Enter a 5px Offset and click OK. Select the resulting shape, fill it with R=35 G=31 B=32 then open the existing Gaussian Blur effect from the Appearance panel. Raise the radius to 20px, click OK and you’re done.

Final

Now your work is done. Here is how it should look like.

Credit to:

http://vforvectors.com

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vectorize-mole-torino020b

Vectorize a Landscape Photo Into a Watercolor Painting-Photoshop\Illustrator Tutorial

Resources Used In This Tutorial

Final Image

Here is a preview of the image that we are going to be creating:

Introduction: the easiest way

There are several interesting and creative ways to create vector illustrations. The technique obviously depend on the final work you want to get, the kind of image you have (if you have one), and your experience to do the job.

The most common way are three, you can start from a blank canvas, from a sketch, or use a photo.

Starting from a blank canvas is the most difficult way. You have no lines to follow and you are alone with your creativity. The bad side of the technique is that you need to be really able and having strong hand-drawing skill.

The second option is hand-drawing a sketch of what you want first. Even to do this step you need to be able with hand-drawing but, once scanned the image, youíll have a template to work to.

The last way is the easiest one and that is the one we are going to use with this tutorial. You start from a photo of the thing you want to vectorize and use it as template building it up level by level.

Choosing the Right Photo

Once chosen the procedure the next extremely important step is choosing the right photo. Not anyone is good to start with. The right photo has to be well contrasted and not too dark but with definite distinction between light and shadow areas. This will help you in identifying the contours.

If you are not comfortable with taking picture than you can purchase images, from a stock photo service, which are suitable for your upcoming creation. Anyway the best thing to do is using shots from your own so that you are not occurring in copyright problems.

Preparing the Image in Photoshop

Step 1

Once identified the technique and chosen the image there are still few steps to accomplish. Before we get started are a few basics need to be covered. To make the vectorization working better once within Illustrator platform we need to prepare it by adjusting lights and levels, turning the image in w/b and deleting some areas of the picture.

As suggested, I prefer taking the picture which I use by myself. Last weekend, having a walk around Iive taken several pictures of the Turinís Mole Antonelliana. Among the various shots Iíve selected this nice and clear pic of the historical monument:

It contains several typical city elements: the Mole, the characteristic dormer windows, a beautiful streetlamp and an old-style tram recently restored. I think it well represent Turin and its beautiful elegance.

Open up the image in Photoshop. Adjust contrast and lights as you like and turn the image w/b by going to Image > Mode > Grayscale.

This is what you get:

Duplicate the level as backup and go ahead.

Step 2

Click CTRL + L (or CMD + L) to open the Level panel.

Adjust levels so that the gray in the sky disappears and leaves all around the main subject clean. Move the handles so that you clean the borders from exceeding gray or black shadows. Move the white handle toward the right side and the black handle toward left has shown below.

Step 3

Go then to Filter > Stylize > Trace Contour

This feature traces the areas in the picture that have the most contrast in value to each other.

Set Upper Edge and a tracing level high to better outline the image. Experiment with the options. These are the value and setting which Iíve used.

Step 4

Once that the photo has been stylized we need to make the lines darker. Duplicate the level, and apply a Multiply blending.

This is what we get.

Step 5

Select the white color by using the magic wand tool and refine the selection by going to Select > Similar.

Delete the white color and leave the image in a transparent level.

Step 6

Select the Rubber Tool. From the Rubber option panel select a dry brush, increase the size and delete part of the artwork. Consider that too many details will make the Illustrator file heavy to manage once vectorized. The cleaning up of the image will avoid a useless proliferation of anchor points.

In the example Iíve removed branches from the trees. In addition Iíve removed the border making the image suitable to fit different shapes without the need of constraining it in a frame.

Have you reminded yourself to save? If not (bad boy/girl!) than do it now.

Polished and with its undefined silhouette the image is now ready to be managed in Illustrator and turned in a vector.

Vectorizing the Image

Step 7

Create a new document by going to File > New.

The document size depending on what your artwork you are going to use for. Iíve selected a 15 x 25 cm size to be sure I can use it as design for a merchandising t-shirt.

In the advanced options choose CMYK as color mode because it has printing use, and High Resolution Raster Effect.

Step 8

Take your photo already managed with Photoshop and import it into Illustrator. To do that go to File > Place and choose the .psd file which you have previously saved.

Place it inside your artwork area.

Step 9

Keep the object selected and go to Object > Live Trace > Tracing Options

Step 10

This step is extremely important. The Tracing Option Panel contains a lot of parameters which are going to affect the vectorizing result. Let’s have a close reading to them.

Preset Specifies a tracing preset.

This change between different presets that Illustrator offers.

Mode

Specifies a color mode for the tracing result.

It allows to switch from black and white, grayscale, or color mode.

Threshold

Specifies a value for generating a black and white tracing result from the original image. All pixels lighter than the Threshold value are converted to white; all pixels darker than the Threshold value are converted to black. (This option is available only when Mode is set to Black and White.).

Palette

Specifies a palette for generating a color or grayscale tracing from the original image. (This option is available only when Mode is set to Color or Grayscale.)

To let Illustrator determine the colors in the tracing, select Automatic. To use a custom palette for the tracing, select a swatch library name. (The swatch library must be open in order for it to appear in the Palette menu.).

This allows you to specify your own color.

Max Colors

Specifies a maximum number of colors to use in a color or grayscale tracing result. (This option is available only when Mode is set to Color or Grayscale and when panel is set to Automatic.).

Obviously the more are the color the heavier is the file.

Output To Swatches

Creates a new swatch in the Swatches panel for each color in the tracing result.
This will give you a control on the colors automatically picked up from the image so that you may change them later.

Blur

Blurs the original image before generating the tracing result. Select this option to reduce small artifacts and smooth jagged edges in the tracing result.

Resample

Resamples the original image to the specified resolution before generating the tracing result. This option is useful for speeding up the tracing process for large images but can yield degraded results.

Fills

Creates filled regions in the tracing result.

Strokes

Creates stroked paths in the tracing result.

Max Stroke Weight

Specifies the maximum width of features in the original image that can be stroked. Features larger than the maximum width become outlined areas in the tracing result.

Min Stroke Length

Specifies the minimum length of features in the original image that can be stroked. Features smaller than the minimum length are omitted from the tracing result.

Path Fitting

Controls the distance between the traced shape and the original pixel shape. Lower values create a tighter path fitting; higher values create a looser path fitting.

Minimum Area

Specifies the smallest feature in the original image that will be traced. For example, a value of 4 specifies that features smaller than 2 pixels wide by 2 pixels high will be omitted from the tracing result.

Corner Angle

Specifies the sharpness of a turn in the original image that is considered a corner anchor point in the tracing result.

Raster

Specifies how to display the bitmap component of the tracing object.

Vector

Specifies how to display the tracing result.

[Italic text from Adobe Illustrator CS4 Help http://help.adobe.com/en_US/Illustrator/14.0/WS714a382cdf7d304e7e07d0100196cbc5f-6226a.html]

Not cited from the Adobe Help we still have:

Ignore White

It omits white from the vectorization. This means that all white areas will be empty and left transparent.

Preview

Le t you see what you have to expect from your settings. Pay attention that depending on the inserted values the preview may slow your computer in the image calculation process.

Info

The shown details hereby listed are the result in terms of anchor points, colors, etc, which coming from your chosen options.

Step 11

Go to Object > Live Trace > Expand the image shows the paths and you can edit whatever you like. This will give you a great flexibility if you need to modify shapes or anchor points.
Once finished lock the level and save.

Step 12

Once you have accomplished this step the main part of the work is completed. At this point the only thing to do is making it better by adding some creative elements. In the example, Iíve decided that my Mole Antonelliana artwork have to look like a watercolor painting. Thatís why I need now is the right tool for the job: a watercolor brush for Illustrator.

You can produce by yourself watercolor brushes or, otherwise, you can use free resources from the web to provide you with the elements you need to finish your artwork. Please, always pay attention to copyright and license of use for any resource you get. Respect your fellows work!

In the example Iíve downloaded the nice Vectips Watercolor Brushes from Vectips.com http://vtfreebi.es/65MP).

Download the resource and load the brush by going in the brush palette. Select the drop down menu and choose Open Brush Library > Other Library. Load the brush from the folder where you have saved it

Step 13

Letís start to paint our artwork to make it more attractive.

Create a new level. Choose brush number 5 and draw a line onto the tram. Change the color with a bright green one.

Step 14

Select brush number 1, pick a bright yellow color and draw few lines around the city lamp.

Step 15

Select brush number 6 and a dark green color. Make irregular circle in the branches area.

Step 16

Select brush number 5 again and with a gray color paint the city lamp pole.

Step 17

Choose cyan color and select brush number one. Make a circle in a new layer and move this layer behind that one which contains the Mole outline.

Step 18

We still can add a touch of color to the Mole by selecting brush n. 4 and red and drawing a single vertical line.

Step 19

Do not forget you sign! Otherwise how can people recognize your work? Sign in a new layer by using your tablet or, otherwise, scan your sign and follow a similar workflow as that one just accomplished to vectorize it well. To stick with the general style of the artwork Iíve handwritten it with my tablet.

And We’re Done!

Here below you can see the final image we get. The subtle and elegant watercolor effect matches perfectly with the general elegance of Turin as city. The outline is clear but detailed, really different form a cartoon style or a simple black silhouette skyline.

As said I think it is a perfect artwork to be printed on city merchandise. Here below Iíve mounted it on a t-shirt to let you see what I mean.
What do you think about?

Credit to:

http://psd.fanextra.com

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