Create Stunning 3D Text in a Grungy Landscape + Psd File

Create Stunning 3D Text in a Grungy Landscape + Psd File

 

The more you can learn about blending images and different elements together in Photoshop, the more freedom you will have in creating whatever pops up in your imagination. In this Photoshop tutorial, we are going to go over different digital-image-editing techniques in order to create a beautiful grungy and grainy composition that has 3D text (that we will make in Illustrator) as its centerpiece.

Author: Tyler Denis

Tyler Denis is a part-time freelance designer from Ashland, New Hampshire. He is also the creator/writer of the design blog Denis Designs/blog, a website dedicated to bringing quality tutorials and inspiration. You can follow him on Twitter or at his personal site, Denis Designs

Preview

Click on the image to see the final result in full scale.

Tutorial Resources

Step 1: Setting Up in Illustrator

We are going to start by opening up Adobe Illustrator and creating a new 1200×1200px document.

Setting Up in Illustrator

Next, download this Grass stock image and bring it into our Illustrator artboard. We are going to be using this photo simply as a reference for the 3D text we will be producing, so you could lock this layer to prevent us from accidentally moving it around. We will reuse this image in Photoshop, so keep it in a handy location.

Step 2: Create the Front of the 3D Text

Use the Type Tool (T) to write out the word “DESIGN” using Myriad Pro Black Condensed or a similar bold sans-serif font. So that our text block is easier to work with, we are going to go to Type > Create Outlines (Shift + Ctrl/Cmd + O) to convert the text layer to vector paths.

Create the Front of the 3D Text

Step 3: Create the Back of the 3D Text

Duplicate the “DESIGN” object–select it with the Selection Tool, press Ctrl/Cmd + C to copy, then press Ctrl/Cmd + F to paste in front. Move the duplicate up to the horizon line of the grass image. Hold down Shift + Alt/Option, then click and drag one of the corners inward to shrink it down, while keeping its position in place.

Create the Front of the 3D Text

Step 4: Developing the 3D Text

First let’s change the fill color of the text in front to a shade of yellow (#FEC719). Let us also change the fill color of the text in the back to a darker, more muted shade of yellow (#CC9933).

Now we are ready to build our 3D text. First, ungroup our two “DESIGN” text objects (select them, and then press Shift + Ctrl/Cmd + G or go to Object > Ungroup).

Let us start with the “D”: Click on the Pen Tool (P) in the Tools Panel, and then create a rectangular shape. Change the color of the rectangular shape to a shade of yellow (#E8DC86).

Developing the 3D Text

Use the Direct Selection Tool (A) to drag the corner anchor points so the ones on the left side align with the left corners of the “D” (use View > Smart Guides to have the box snap to the corners of the “D”). Make another rectangular shape that covers the middle part of the “D” as well.

Developing the 3D Text

Select all the vector shapes associated with the “D” and go to Object > Group to make our work more manageable and organized.

We are going to go through each of the letters and create rectangular shapes that connect the front letter to its back letter, just like we did with the “D”. To make the process easier, you can change the colors of the sides of the text to visually see them better (then we could just correct the colors later on).

Developing the 3D Text

Developing the 3D Text

Developing the 3D Text

Developing the 3D Text

Be sure to group the components of each letter together, just like with the letter “D”, or else our Illustrator document can become unwieldy.

Step 5: Create Gradient Swatches

Now that our 3D text is starting to take shape, we can start working on the colors we will be using. To do the shading of our text, we are going to create gradient swatches, which we will later use on subsequent steps. If the Gradient Panel isn’t already open, go to Window > Gradient.

Set your Fill color to a shade of yellow (#EDB329), drag it to the left side of our gradient in the Gradient Panel, switch your Fill color to a brown (#7E4920), and, again, drag it to the right side of our gradient. Drag the Gradient Fill we created from the Gradient Panel into the Swatches Panel to add it as a swatch–this will make it easier for us to use this gradient in our work (we merely have to click on it to fill the target objects).

We are also going to create a gradient with brown color (#B97E2E) on the left of the gradient and a darker brown (#7E4920) on the right. Drag this into the Swatches Panel also.

Create Gradient Swatches

Step 6: Connecting the 3D Text

We want to finish the back end of our text, starting with the “D”. Select the “D” group and then go to Object > Ungroup. Click on the top part of the text and, while holding Shift, click on the back “D” letter to select both of those vector objects. If you don’t already have the Pathfinder Panel open, go to Window > Pathfinder (Shift + Ctrl/Cmd + F9). Alt/Option + click on the Unite Pathfinder icon, and then click on the Expand button.

Connecting the 3D Text

Select the “S”, press Ctrl/Cmd + C to copy, and then press Ctrl/Cmd + F to paste in front so that we end up with two small “S” shapes. Click on one of the “S” shapes and the top part of the “S”, Alt/Option + click on the Unite Pathfinder icon, and then click on the Expand button. This will add the two shapes together and add a little bump on the right side, which we need to get rid of. Click on the shape with the Selection Tool (V) and then switch to the Pen Tool (P). Click on the undesired anchor points to delete them. Take the other “S” shape and the darker bottom shape of the “S”, Alt/Option + click on the Unite Pathfinder icon, and then click on the Expand button.

With the “G”, just combine the two visible shapes by clicking on the Unite Pathfinder icon.

Connecting the 3D Text

Step 7: Adding Color Gradient

Next, we need to figure out where our light source is coming from so that we have consistent lighting. Let’s decide now that we are going to make the light come from the top of our composition.

So, with the light source in mind, we are going to start adding in our gradients by clicking each piece and adding in the light and dark gradients that we saved in our Swatches Panel. You can adjust the gradient with the Gradient Tool (G) in the Tools Panel after you have applied it. Afterwards, change the face of the letters to a muted yellow shade (#E8DC86).

Adding Color Gradient

Step 8: Creating the Second Line of Text

Use the Type Tool (T) to write out “INSTRUCT” with the font, Myriad Black Condensed (or your preferred bold, condensed, sans-serif font). Position it below our “DESIGN” text. Go to Type > Create Outlines. Then go to Effect > Warp > Arch and change the Vertical option to 10% to make the text appear as if it is laying on the ground.

Creating the Second Line of Text

Step 9: Enhancing the Grass in Photoshop

Open the Grass image again, but this time, in Photoshop. We are going to do some color adjustments to the grass so it looks a little greener.

Go to Image > Adjustment > Replace Color. Click on the green and brown/tan area (holding Shift and clicking on different areas of the image you want to sample from will add to the selection), and then adjust the hue to a stronger green color.

Enhancing the Grass in Photoshop

Step 10: Removing the Sky from the Grass Image

Open up Photoshop and create a new 1200×1200px document. This is the document where we will bring our composition together.

First, bring in the grass image that we just enhanced in the previous step, and then use Free Transform (Ctrl/Cmd + T) to resize the image so that it is the same width as the document.

We are going to chop off the sky of the image. To do that, we are going to use the Pen Tool (P) to create a path that surrounds the sky part of the grass image. Go to the Paths Panel (Window > Paths) and Ctrl/Cmd + click on the path we just made to load a selection around the sky. Go back to the Layers Panel, click on the grass layer in the Layers Panel to make it the active layer, and then press Delete to remove the sky.

Enhancing the Grass in Photoshop

Step 11: Bring in the 3D Text from Illustrator

Let’s go back to our Illustrator document and copy our “DESIGN” text, and then switch back to Photoshop and paste it on there. Do the same with our “INSTRUCT” text. Since we used the same document dimensions (and used the grass image as a reference for alignment), pasting it into Photoshop preserves the positions of our text. If this isn’t the case, just use the Move Tool (V) to move the text around so that they are positioned in the canvas properly.

Bring in the 3D Text from Illustrator

Step 12: Creating the Cliff

Let’s start working on the cliff that will be at the bottom of our composition. Go get the Cliff stock image I listed in the Tutorial Resources section above, and then bring it into our canvas. Rotate it 180o with Free Transform (Ctrl/Cmd + T) and scale it down so that it is the same size as our canvas. Move it behind the grass layer.

Creating the Cliff

Step 13: Create a Grassy Edge Using a Photoshop Brush

To give the edge where our grass and cliff meets a more organic look, we’ll need to do some retouching. Select the grass layer, then go to Layer > Add Layer Mask > Reveal All. Use the Rectangular Marquee Tool (M) to create a selection around the bottom part of the grass. I toggled off the visibility of my text layers temporarily so that I can focus on this part of the process.

Switch your Foreground Color to black (#000000), then hit Alt/Option + Backspace to fill the selected area with your Foreground Color. This should mask out the selected area (a refresher: When painting on layer masks–black hides, white reveals).

Now we are going to gradually fill back the hidden area using a Photoshop brush. First, switch to the Brush Tool (B). Then go to Window > Brushes (F5) and uncheck the Scattering, Color Dynamics, and Other Dynamics options.

Click on the Brush Tip Shape option, locate the Grass brush tip shape in the preview pane on the right, and change its angle to 180o.

Now we can start using our brush on the area we masked away. Select white (#FFFFFF) as our Foreground Color and drop the size of the brush down to around 60px Master Diameter. Start painting away some of the bottom edge of the grass to create a more natural boundary between the grass and the cliff.

Create a Grassy Edge Using a Photoshop Brush

Step 14: Enhancing the Cliff

Click on the cliff layer and go to Image > Adjustment > Levels to open up the Levels dialog window. Bring the left slider in a little bit to bring out more of the blacks and darken the image a little bit.

Enhancing the Cliff

Let’s add some shadows to the cliff. Pick a brownish greenish color (#1F1C09) for our Foreground Color. We choose this color because the green grass is going to cast a shadow on the brown cliff, so we want to show that in our color selections. Create a layer above the grass and the cliff. Use the Brush Tool (Hardness: 0%, Master Diameter: 20px) to paint on the top surfaces of the cliff. When finished, change the Blend Mode of the layer to Soft Light.

Create a new layer and use a bigger brush tip (Master Diameter: 100px) to paint just below the grass to give these areas a stronger shadow. Change the Blend Mode of the layer to Multiply and lower the Opacity to 50%.

Create another layer below the grass layer, and paint under the grass. Change the Blend Mode of this layer to Multiply.

Enhancing the Cliff

Step 15: Adding Highlights on the Grass

To give the grassy edge some nice highlighting, we are going to create a new layer and add a white-to-0%-opacity color gradient using the Gradient Tool. To do this, first, change your Foreground Color to white (#FFFFFF). Then switch to the Gradient Tool (G). In the Options Bar, click on the Gradient Editor and then choose the Foreground to Transparent gradient preset. Then create our gradient on the new layer, starting from the bottom of the canvas, and going towards the top.

Adding Highlights on the Grass

Go to Layer > Layer Mask > Reveal All. Use a black brush–with 0% Hardness and about 125px Master Diameter–to paint away the cliff and some of the bottom portions of the grass.

Adding Highlights on the Grass

Change the Blend Mode of the layer to Overlay and lower the Opacity to 30%. This will give the grass a highlight as well as a shadow effect on the front of the grass.

Adding Highlights on the Grass

Step 16: Adding the Cityscape

Let’s go grab our Cityscape stock image and open it up in Photoshop. Isolate the buildings by using your favorite method (such as using the Pen Tool to draw around them and then copying the selection) and bring them into our canvas. Shrink down the cityscape with Free Transform and locate it on the horizon of the grass with the Move Tool (V). Duplicate the cityscape layer (Layer > Duplicate Layer), then go to Edit > Transform > Flip Horizontally.

Adding the Cityscape

Using the Polygonal Lasso Tool (L), take off the big building on the right side of the duplicate to create some variance between the left and right sides of our cityscape.

Adding the Cityscape

Step 17: Adding the Sky

Grab this Sky stock image and place it into our canvas. This layer should be behind the cityscape layers.

Adding the Sky

Step 18: Enhancing the Realism of the Grass around the Text

Select the grass layer and the white-to-transparent highlight layer that’s on top of it, then combine them by going to Layer > Merge Layers.

To work on the grass in front of the “DESIGN” text block, use the Rectangular Marquee Tool (M) to load a selection around the front of the text block, click on the grass layer in the Layers Panel to make sure it’s the active layer, then go to Layer > Duplicate Layer to place the selected area in a new layer.

Enhancing the Realism of the Grass around the Text

Move this layer above the 3D text, then go to Layer > Layer Mask > Hide All.

We need to make the grass blend better with our text. Let’s use our Grass brush again with the same settings as before. Brush away the bottom part of the “DESIGN” text block until you get a satisfactory result.

Step 19: Adding Shadows to the Text

Now we are going to create a drop shadow under the text. Ctrl/Cmd + click on the text layer’s preview thumbnail in the Layers Panel to make a selection around our text. Go to Layer > New > Layer to create a new layer above the text layer and fill the area underneath the selection with black (#000000).

Go to Layer > Duplicate Layer so you have two black text layers. Click on the first black layer in the Layers Panel to make it the active layer, go to Filter > Blur > Gaussian Blur (set the Radius to 4px), and run the filter on it.

Adding Shadows to the Text

Run the Gaussian Blur filter again on the second black layer, but this time, set the Radius of the filter to 10px.

We will have some excess shadows that we don’t want, so we’ll use a layer mask to get rid of those. Go to Layer > Add Layer Mask > Reveal All to place a mask on the black text layers, and just start painting away the unwanted portions of the shadows.

Adding Shadows to the Text

Step 20: Adding Textures to the Scene

Time to “grungify” our piece, starting with our 3D text. To kick things off, download the Cracked Texture and theExperimental Texture, then open them in Photoshop.

Bring the Experimental texture into our main document and use Free Transform to size it so it fits over our text. Ctrl/Cmd + click on the text layer’s thumbnail in the Layers Panel to load a selection around it. You should still be on the Experimental texture layer (if not, switch back to it). Go to Select > Inverse and delete the selected area. Change the Blend Mode of the Experimental texture layer to Color Burn and lower its Opacity to 50%.

Adding Textures to the Scene

Now bring in the Cracked texture and do the same thing, except change the Blend Mode to Soft Light (instead of Color Burn).

Adding Textures to the Scene

Download this Film Texture and open it in Photoshop. Place it into our main document, making sure that it is covering the entire canvas. Change the Blend Mode of the Film texture layer to Soft Light.

Go to Image > Adjustments > Curves and perform adjustments so as to lighten up the layer a bit so that it’s not too harsh.

Adding Textures to the Scene

Adding Textures to the Scene

Step 21: Adjusting the Scene’s Colors

We are going to adjust the color of our scene now, just to try and tie everything together better.

First, we will use a Gradient Map adjustment layer; go to Layer > New Adjustment Layer > Gradient Map to add one on top of all the layers. Change the Blend Mode of the Gradient Map layer to Soft Light and reduce the Opacity to 40%.

Adjusting the Scene's Colors

We’ll add another adjustment layer; Go to Layer > New Adjustment Layer > Hue/Saturation. Change the Saturation option to about -70. This should dramatically change our composition’s colors so that it has this sort of faded, retro/vintage look to it.

Adjusting the Scene's Colors

Step 22: Softening the Edges of the Canvas

Let’s soften up the edges of the piece a bit so that we draw better attention to our centerpiece. Use the Rectangular Marquee Tool to place a selection around the canvas–but ever so slightly smaller than it–adjust the Feather option to 60px in the Options Bar, go to Select > Inverse (Shift + Ctrl/Cmd + I), and fill the inverted selection with black. Change the Blend Mode to Overlay afterwards.

Softening the Edges of the Canvas

Step 23: Final Adjustments and Enhancements

It’s best to save your work before doing this step so that you can go back to your work and modify it later on.

Go to Layer > Flatten Image to combine all of our layers into one layer. Go to Layer > Duplicate Layer to duplicate our flattened layer, then Filter > Other > High Pass (set the Radius at about 4.3px before your execute the filter).

Final Adjustments and Enhancements

Change the Blend Mode of the layer to Soft Light.

Flatten the image again. Use the Elliptical Marquee Tool (M) with Feather at 60px to make a circle in the middle of the canvas that covers the text. Go to Select > Inverse. Then go to Filter > Blur > Gaussian Blur with the Radius set at about 1.8px.

Final Adjustments and Enhancements

This should slightly blur the areas around the text to give our centerpiece a better focal point as well as enhance our depth of field.

Tutorial Summary

In this tutorial, we used Illustrator to produce some interesting 3D text. We then built our composition in Photoshop using various techniques such as smooth-blending edges using layer masks and a Photoshop brush, applying image adjustments, using adjustment layers to control the scene’s colors, and more.

Here is what I came up with; make sure to link to your version in the comments (and add it to our Flickr group)!

Download Source Files

Incoming search terms:

  • illustrator map texture
  • photoshop tutorials text effects
  • psd text action
  • free photoshop tutorials text effects
  • photoshop texture
  • textures for landscape
  • 3d yazı psd
  • cracked pattern photoshop
  • text effect tutorial
  • free flyer templates psd

final

Create a Neon Text Effect-Illustrator Tutorial

Final Image Preview

In this tutorial we will learn how to create a neon text effect using Gradient Mesh, 3D Modeling, Art Brushes and Transparency palette. Let’s begin!


Tutorial Details

  • Program: Adobe IllustratorCS-CS5;
  • Difficulty: Beginner
  • Estimated Completion Time: 15-20 minutes

Step 1

Create a neon text effect using the RGB color mode. If this mode is not set for your document, set it (File> Document Color Mode> RGB Color). Start by creating a background, take the Rectangle Tool (M) and create a rectangle with black fill.


Step 2

Keep the rectangle selected, go to Object> Create Gradient Mesh … and in the dialogue window set the number of rows and columns equal three.

Select central nodes of the gradient mesh using the Direct Selection Tool (A) and fill them with different colors, with the same tool, move the nodes as shown in the figure below.


Step 3

Proceed to the creation of the text. Take the Type Tool (T) and create a text, in my case this word is NEON. I used the Tahoma bold font. You can change the height and width of text using the Selection Tool (V).


Step 4

Keep the text selected, go to Effect> 3D> Extrude & Bevel and set effect parameters in the dialog window.

If after having applied the effect, there is a need in editing of the parameters, you can get the access to them from the menu of the Appearance palette.


Step 5

Lock 3D object in the Layers palette, later it will be used as a template. Now prepare shapes to create Art Brush. These shapes can be obtained through the transformation of the circle. The height of the first shape is 2 px, and the height of the second one is 1 px.

It is not necessary that you copy them exactly, they just have to be similar to these shapes. Fill these shapes with gray color. Now drag these shapes one at a time to the Brushes palette and save new brushes as Art Brushes.


Step 6

For convenience in the further work, change the template font color to dark gray, almost black, and lock it in the Layers palette again.

Using the Pen Tool (P) create dashes as shown in the figure below, basing on the template. Apply the first created brush to the dashes.

Apply similar technique to all the letters of the template.


Step 7

Now take the second brush created in step 5, take the Paint Brush Tool (B) and continue to outline the letters of the template. If you did not do well with brush stroke, you can undo the last action by pressing the keyboard combination of Cmd / Ctrl + Z or the edit line shape with the help of the Direct Selection Tool (A).


Step 8

Take the Pen Tool (P) and outline the front surfaces of the letters, there is no need in being very exact.

Now the template can be deleted.


Step 9

Select all the elements created by us, except for the background, and set the Color Dodge Blending mode for them in the Transparency palette.


Step 10

Create the light glares on the letters. Take the Ellipse Tool (L) and create a circle. Fill it with radial gradient from white to black color.

Now set the Color Dodge Blending mode for this shape in the Transparency palette.

Place such items in different places. Gradient of some elements can be replaced with black and gray.


Step 11

Now create a few similar elements, but after filling with radial gradient bring the circle to the shape of an ellipse using the Selection Tool (V).

Locate the elliptical elements as shown in the image below.

Final Image
Credit to:

Incoming search terms:

  • text effect psd
  • psd text effects
  • free psd text
  • neon effect photoshop
  • text effect free psd
  • photoshop chrome effect
  • neon words photoshop
  • neon text effect photoshop
  • chrome text
  • neon illustrator text

Preview

Studio Look+3D Text|Photoshop Tutorial

In this HD tutorial I will show you how to create a studio look and a 3D text effect all inside Photoshop!.
*Song-John Dahlback – Pyramid (Dirty South Remix).
*Made by O.R Design: http://www.youtube.com/ordesigns
*For more speed arts,free psd’s,tutorials,free graphics and much more:
http://www.youtube.com/psdfreakcom

 


Incoming search terms:

  • download tutorial psd text di photoshop
  • 3d text tutorial
  • text effect psd free
  • studio 3d psd
  • studio psd 3d
  • free graphic effects psd
  • create a studio photoshop
  • 3d text photoshop tutorial
  • photoshop tutorial 3d text
  • photoshop 3d text tutorial

22

Create Flat 3D-Photoshop Tutorial

In this tutorial you will learn how to create some Flat 3D using only Photoshops Brushtool. In the past I used to use just an action to duplicate and move but this way is much more easier and give you more flexibility.

Download

Step 1

Open up Photoshop and create a New Document. I created a document that is 1280 x 720 at 300 ppi and named it style.

1

Step 2

Let’s change the background color to a nice mild blue. On the menu bar choose Edit > Fill. In the dialog box change the Use dropdown to Color… Choose #d0e4ed

Step 3

Create a New Layer (Layer > New > Layer) and name it Original Text

Step 4

Choose the Horizontal Type Tool (T) and type in the text ‘style’. I used Helvetica Neue LT at 27pt. If you don’t have that font, use something like Arial. Make sure the color of the text is black (#000000)

Step 5

We are now going to create a brush out of this text. Choose Select > Load Selection. Make sure the Channel is set to Original Text Transparency and click OK. This will make a marquee around your text. Note: Your document name might be different.

Step 6

Now go to Edit > Define Brush Preset and click on OK

Step 7

Create a New Layer and name it Stroke. Deselect everything by going to Select > Deselect. Choose the Brush Tool (B) and in the Brush Options toolbar click on the drop down triangle and find the brush you just created and select it.

Step 8

Open the Brushes Panel (F5 or Window > Brushes). Click on Brush Tip Shape options. Change the Spacing to 1%.

Step 9

Now for the fun part! Change the Foreground Color to a nice eye popping pink – #fd2f84 by double clicking on the foreground color in the toolbar. Make sure you are still on the Stroke layer and with the brush held down make a nice swoop like stroke.

Step 10

Inside of the Layers (F7) Panel, drag the Original Text layer above the Stroke layer Then using the Move tool (V), move it over the swoop you just made.

.

Step 11

Double click on the Stroke layer in the layers panel. Click on the Stroke checkbox and set it to have a 7 px Size Stroke of White.

Step 12

Using the Brush tool is fun and all, but sometimes you might want a cleaner look. We can accomplish this by using the Pen tool.

Click on the Pen (P) tool and draw a line or curve. Something like this:

Step 13

Change the Foreground Color to Black (#000000). Create a New Layer and name it Stroke 2. Open the Paths panel (Window > Paths) and click on the Work Path you just created with the pen tool. Now click back on the brush tool. Click on the Stroke path with brush button at the bottom of the Paths Panel. You should now have a black 3D style. See how that looks a lot cleaner? Note: You can delete the Work Path to get rid of the Pen line.

Step 14

Now Duplicate the Original Text layer by selecting the layer and going to Layer > Duplicate Layer. Click on the Horizontal Type Tool and change the color of the text to the pink color (#fd2f84) in the Type Options Toolbar. Move it into position above the Stroke 2 layer.

Step 15

Now Right Click on the Stroke layer and choose Copy Layer Style. Then Right Click on the Stroke 2 layer and choose Paste Layer Style. This will create the stroke so that it is exactly how the other one was.

Step 16

Let’s create some more! Using the same techniques as above, create some more stokes and text layers. Try experimenting with the size of the brush as well as moving around the elements and layer stacking. I decided to crop mine a little bit. Here is what I came up with:

Step 17

We are going to add a lot of style text behind everything. Create a New Layer and name it Lots of Styles. Make sure this layer is just above the background layer in the layer stack. Open up the Brushes Panel and in the Brush Tip Shape options, change the Spacing to 416%. Check the Shape Dynamics option, and change the Size Jitter to 100%, Minimum Diameter to 9%, and the Angle Jitter to 55%

Step 18

Now choose a slighly darker blue Foreground Color I used #6dbbde. With the Brush tool selected, hold down the mouse, move around and it will randomly place the text everywhere on your document.

Step 19

Choose the Gradient Tool (G) and select Linear Gradient. Open the Gradient Editor by clicking on the gradient. I choose the colors #6dbbde and #d0e4ed. Click OK. With the gradient tool setill selected, select the Background layer and drag from left to right across your project to create the very nice subtle gradient.

Step 20

Open up the lines.eps from the Support files and copy and paste the lines into the right hand side of the document. You might need to Transform and Rotate it so it fills the whole area. Make sure the layer is just above the Background gradient layer. Change the Opacity of this layer to 71%. Now change the Layer Blending mode to Overlay.

Step 21

Open spraypaint.png and place this layer into your project. Double click on the spraypaint layer to bring up the Layer Styles. Choose the Color Overlay option and change the color to the same pink color (#fd2f84). Position the layer so it looks good. You might need to transform it a little.

Step 22

Open star.eps and create a brush using the same settings like we did in Step 17. Change the Foreground color to white and brush some stars into your document. That’s it we are all done!

Credit to:

http://mediamilitia.com

Incoming search terms:

  • flat portfolio template
  • free psd flat
  • blend modes psd
  • creating flat white logos photoshop
  • free open flat card box tutorial
  • brush ribbon psd
  • how to make flat 3d
  • make flat logos 3d in photoshop
  • psd flat
  • wedding horizontal card 3D photoshop tutorials

Sponsored Ads

Ad
full_600

3D Text Shatter Effect – C4D/Photoshop Tutorial

This effect is made in two programs, Cinema 4D and Photoshop.If you haven’t heard of Cinema 4D before it is a relatively easy to use 3d application, it is quite similar to 3dsMax or Maya. I will go pretty in depth with the Cinema 4D part, for all the inexperienced users, so bare with me if I go too slow. Now enough chit chat, let’s jump in.

Required Resources

In this tutorial we will be using some resources you will want to download before starting:

Download

(Optional) Cinema 4d material

*NEW* – We just released a font that you can download that creates a similar effect. Check it out!

Final Image Preview

Step 1: Creating the basic text

Open up Cinema 4D and make a text object

Write “Media Militia” in the text object

Now rotate your text object: 90* on the X axis and -90* on the Y axis

Create an Extrude NURBS object

And drop your text in it

Change the object properties of the Extrude NURBS to 0 / 0 / 35

Now take your ExtrudeNURBS object and hit “C” (this makes your object editable)

Open this object and select everything (Ctrl+A) then right click your object and press “Connect”

You can now delete your old object that you just “Connected”

Rename your object “Media Militia”

Take the polygon tool and the Rectangle Selection tool, make sure to un check the “only select visible elements” box

Now with the scroll button of your mouse click on your “canvas” and you will see that four different views just opened up, we will be using the top view

So middle click on the top view to make that view bigger, and select the first “M” letter of Media Militia right click on it and press “Split”

This creates a new object with just the “M” now delete the selection you have selected, this will delete the “M” from Media which leaves you with an “M” object and a “edia Milita” object. Rename the object you just split to “M”

Now go back to your “Media Militia” object and select and split the “t”, just as we did with the “M”. Delete the “t” from your Media Militia object and rename the “t” you just split to “t”

Middle click on your screen and go back to perspective view. Take the Live Selection tool and on your “M” object select the shown polygon:

Right click on your screen and select “Extrude”

Add 350 to the offset

Go into Top View and select your “t” object, press Ctrl+A (to select all the polygons) then take your Scale Tool and scale up the X axis (or the red axis) to 220

Go back to Perspective View and select the shown polygon with the Live Selection tool

Right click on your screen and select Extrude and add 1000 m in the Offset

Take your Use Model tool and the Live Selection tool

Make a floor

Go into Right View, select your three text objects and move them right on top of your floor

Now make two copies of each text object, and place each copy underneath it’s original, name each object as shown below

Create a Shatter Object and copy it, name one shatter object “Shatter 1” and the other one “Shatter 2”

Change the strength of the “Shatter 1” object to 20 %, and the strength of the “Shatter 2” object to 10%

Select both Shatter objects and copy them twice, now place a Shatter object in each copied text object (match them up according to their number as shown)

Now select all of your text objects ending with either a 1 or a 2 and take the Live Selection tool

And move the “green axis” up 14.3 points, so that it is on top of the original text object

Go into top view, take your Polygon tool and select all your text objects ending with “1”

Make sure you have no polygons selected (left click anywhere on your canvas to de-select any polygons you might have selected)

Right click on your canvas and select “Knife” (make sure the visible only is checked)

Now start randomly cutting from one side of your text to another, do this around 30-60 times (this will make the shattered pieces smaller)

Make sure you don’t leave any long polygons like the extruded M and T uncut

Keep cutting until you have something like this

Now do the same for the text objects ending with “2”

After that go into side view and start cutting up the text objects ending with 1 and 2 just as we did earlier (make sure to un check the “Visible Only” box)

Now select all your “2” text objects and scale up the green axis using the scale tool

Then move it down, so that the top of the letters are slightly on top of your original text

Now take all the “1” text objects and scale them up as well

Then as we did before move them down, so that the top is a little higher then the original text

Step 2: Adding Light and textures to our image

Make a basic light

Make three copies of it, and name them 1, 2, 3, 4 accordingly

Change the Intensity of the first three light objects to 45% and change the intensity of the 4th light to 70%

Now select the 2nd 3rd and 4th light objects and change the shadow to “Shadow Maps (Soft)”

Now go into top view and move each light as shown below

Go into side view, select all your lights and move them up a bit as shown

Now we are going to make the materials for our floor and for our text

Start by making a new material

Double click on the material (to open the material editor) and change the color to the following

Now check the boxes for Luminance, Bump, Specular, and Displacement

Change the settings to the settings shown in the screen shots below (In the bump and displacement options you will have to load in the metal texture image)

Now close the material editor, and drop the material onto the floor

This next part isn’t necessary but it gives your text a nice touch, it does take longer to render though.

We are going to load our downloaded material and place it on all of our text objects

Go into the render settings, and change the Output to the following

Then we are going to put on Global Illumination and Ambient Occlusion (just click the check box on the top, leave all the other settings on default)

Before we render our scene we are going to set our perspective view on a nice angle, I put my picture on this angle

Now hit the render button

This can take quite a while, depending on how strong your computer is, but after that we are done with Cinema 4d and we will go play in photoshop :)

Once it is finished rendering save it as a jpg format, and 300 dpi (dots per inch)

Step 3: Editing the picture in photoshop

Open your image in photoshop

Double click your layer and name it “Base”

Make a new layer under your base layer and fill it with white

Now add a white mask to your “Base” and with a large soft black brush (bring the opacity of your brush down to 50%) start masking out the colored edges

Now import your metal texture and resize it so that I covers the entire media militia text, desaturate the texture and change the blending mode to overlay.

Take your eraser tool and delete any harsh exteriors

Take your base layer and go to Image>Adjustment>Curves and change the settings to something like the following

Now import your ink texture, rasterize it, and name it Ink. Make sure you place it underneath the metal texture

Change the blending mode to multiply

Add a mask to the layer and get rid of all the dark areas surrounding the actual ink

Now duplicate this layer and hide the original, rotate and move your copy so that it is on top of the text, then with a very soft brush mask out the parts that stick out from the text.

Then after that change the transparency to 5%-50% (change it around so that you get a random look) and with a small brush start brushing the edges of the ink that is on top of your text

Duplicate your original ink texture and cover another part of the text and repeat the same process as with the other ink texture. Do this until all your text is covered with ink textures.

Now select all your ink layers and add them to a group, name the group Ink.

Change the opacity of your ink group to 40%

Now make a new layer, name it Shadow, and with a black color and a soft, big brush add a line around the text as shown:

Add a Gaussian Blur, 17 px, and bring down the opacity to 30 percent. Now delete any parts of the shadow that you don’t like with a big soft brush

Credit to:

http://mediamilitia.com

 

Incoming search terms:

  • free psd 3d text
  • shatter psd
  • c4d photoshop
  • photoshop 3d text psd
  • 3d text in photoshop
  • text texture psd
  • c4d text template
  • 3d yazı fontları
  • free download Gallery Cinema 4D
  • Cinema 4D Templates

00

Create a Jar and Splashy, Purple Text Effect-Illustrator Tutorial

In the following tutorial you will learn how to create a jar illustration and splashy, purple text effect. We’ll craft this with numerous, layered shapes and with various opacities. We’ll work with paths and the Pathfinder tools to enhance our text, give it dimension, and style. Let’s get started!


Step 1

Create a 700px by 560px, RGB document. Start with the background. You’ll need this photo. Save it in your hard drive, then drag it inside your illustrator document. Make sure that it covers your entire artboard.

Now pick the Rectangle Tool (M). Create a shape the size of your artboard, fill it with white, then open the Transparency panel (Window > Transparency). Select this fresh shape along with the photo, open the fly-out menu of the Transparency panel, then go to Make Opacity Mask. Finally, lock this masked shape to make sure that you don’t select or move it accidentally.


Step 2

Turn off the visibility for the masked shape made in the previous step. Next, you’ll create the starting shapes for the jar illustration. First, turn on the Grid (View > Grid) and the Snap to Grid (View > Snap to Grid). You’ll need a grid every 5px. Go to Edit > Preferences > Guides & Grid, enter 5 in the Gridline every box and 1 in the Subdivisions box.

You can also open the Info panel (Window > Info) for a live preview with the size and position of your shapes. Do not forget to replace the unit of measurement to pixels from Edit > Preferences > Unit > General. All these options will significantly increase your work speed.

Now, let’s create these shapes. Start with the Ellipse Tool(L) and create a 105 by 30px shape. Fill it with any color, then double-click on it (in the Layers panel) and name it “1.” Continue with the Rectangle Tool (M). First, create a 105px by 85px shape, then create a 105px by 30px shape.

Place these two shapes as shown in the second image, then name them “2? and “3.” Create a third rectangle. Make it 55px wide and 20px tall, place it as shown in the third image and name it “4.” Finally, create two similar rectangles. Both shapes must be 55px wide and 5px tall. Place them as shown in the final image and name them “5? and “6.” For the moment the fill colors do not matter. I used different tints of red so that you can distinguish them from each other.


Step 3

Let’s make some changes for the shapes made in the previous step. Pick the Direct Selection Tool (A) and focus on shape number 3. Select the top, left anchor point and move it 25px to the right. Now select the top, right anchor point and move it 25px to the left. Now, your shape should look like a trapezoid. Reelect it and go to Effect > Warp > Bulge. Enter the data shown below, click OK, then go to Object > Expand Appearance. Double-click on the resulting shape and rename it “3.”


Step 4

Continue with shape number 5. Select it and go to Effect > Warp > Bulge. Enter the data shown below image #1, click OK, then go to Effect > Warp > Arc. Enter the data shown below image #2, click OK, then go to Object > Expand Appearance.

Move to shape number 6. Select it and go to Effect > Warp > Bulge. Enter the data shown above image #3, click OK, then go to Effect > Warp > Arc. Enter the data shown above image #4, click, OK then go to Object > Expand Appearance. Do not forget to rename the resulting shapes “5? and “6.”


Step 5

Make a copy of shape number 5 (Command + C > Command + F). Select this copy along with shape number 3, and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel. Duplicate shapes 5 and 6. Select these two copies along with shape number 4, and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel.


Step 6

Turn back to visible the background image. Now, let’s add some color for the jar shapes. Start with shape number 1. Fill it with R=241, G=242, B=242, then select the fill from the Appearance panel and lower it’s Opacity to 30%.

With the fill still selected, move to the bottom of the Appearance panel, and click on the Duplicate Selected Item icon. This will add a copy of the selected fill. Select this new fill and replace the fill color with the radial gradient shown in the second image. Take a closer look at the gradient image and you’ll notice a yellow zero. It stands for Opacity percentage.


Step 7

Turn off the Snap to Grid (View > Snap to Grid), then go to Edit > Preferences > General and enter 0,5 in the Keyboard Increment box. Make two copies of the shape from the previous step (Command + C > Command + F).

Select the top copy, then hit the right arrow seven times, and the down arrow three times. Reselect both copies and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel. Select the resulting shape and remove the second fill (the one with the radial gradient).


Step 8

Again, make two copies of this oval shape. Select the top copy and hit the down arrow only once. Reselect both copies and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel. Select the resulting shape and remove the fill with the gradient.


Step 9

Let’s move up to shapes number 2 and 3. First, make a new copy of the oval shape, then select these two shapes, and click on the Unite button from the Pathfinder panel. Select the resulting shape, and the copy of the oval shape, then click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel. The resulting shape should look like the third image. Fill it with R=241, G=242, B=242, and lower its Opacity to 40%.


Step 10

Once again, make a copy of the oval shape, then duplicate the shape made in the previous step. Select these fresh copies and click on the Unite button from the Pathfinder panel. Make sure that the resulting shape is filled with R=241, G=242, B=242, (Opacity 40%), then add a 0.25pt stroke. Align it to outside and set the color to R=241, G=242, B=242.


Step 11

Select the shape made in the previous step and make two copies. Select the top copy and hit the right arrow three times. Reselect both copies and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel.

Select the resulting shape, remove the stroke and lower its Opacity to 30%. Again, make two new copies of the shape made in the previous step. Select the top copy and hit the down arrow once. Reselect both copies and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel.

Again, select the resulting shape, remove the stroke and lower its Opacity to 30%. One more time, make two copies of the shape made in the previous step. Select the top copy and hit the left arrow ten times. Reselect both copies and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel. Select the resulting shape, remove the stroke, and lower its Opacity to 30%.


Step 12

Enable the Snap to Grid (View > Snap to Grid). Pick the Ellipse Tool (L), create a 105px by 20px shape, and place it as shown in the first image. Fill it with none and add a 0,5pt stroke (any color). Pick the Direct Selection Tool (A), select the top anchor point, then hit the Delete button. Select the stroke of the resulting path, make it white, and lower its Opacity to 50%.

Make a copy of this path and the shape made in step number 10. Select both copies and click on the Divide button from the Pathfinder panel. You will get a group of two shapes. Ungroup them and then select the top shape. Fill it with the linear gradient shown in the final image and lower its Opacity to 30%. You will need the other shape in the next step.


Step 13

Pick the Rectangle Tool (M) and create a shape like the white one shown in the first image. Select it along with the bottom shape made in the previous step, and click on the Intersect button from the Pathfinder panel. Fill the resulting shape with white and lower its Opacity to 20%. Disable the Snap to Grid.

Duplicate the top shape (made in the previous step), then pick the Pen Tool (P), and create a shape like the white one shown in the third image. Select these two shapes and click on the Intersect button from the Pathfinder panel. Fill the resulting shape with the linear gradient shown in the final image, and lower its Opacity to 30%.


Step 14

Select shape number 5. Fill it with R=230, G=231, B=232, then select the fill (from the Appearance panel), and lower its Opacity to 60%. Add a 0,25pt stroke for this shape, align it to inside, and set the color to R=241, G=242, B=242.


Step 15

Make two copies of shape 5. Select the top copy and hit the left arrow ten times. Reselect both copies and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel. Now focus on the resulting shape. Remove the stroke, then select the fill and lower the Opacity to 30%.

Make two new copies of shape 5. Select the top copy, then hit the down arrow and the right arrow once. Reselect both copies and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel. Again, remove the stroke of the resulting shape, then select the fill and lower its Opacity to 50%.


Step 16

Reselect shape number 5 and go to Object > Path > Offset Path. Enter a -1,5px Offset and click OK. Fill the resulting shape with the linear gradient shown in the second image, lower its Opacity to 50%, and remove the stroke.


Step 17

Let’s move to shape number 4. Fill it with R=241, G=242, B=242, then select the fill (from the Appearance panel) and lower its Opacity to 60%. Add a 0,25pt stroke for this shape, align it to outside and set the color to R=241, G=242, B=242.


Step 18

Make two copies of shape 4. Select the top copy and hit the left arrow ten times. Reselect both copies and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel. Now focus on the resulting shape. Remove the stroke, then select the fill, and lower the Opacity to 30%.

Make two new copies of shape 4. Select the top copy and hit the down arrow once. Reselect both copies and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel. Again, remove the stroke of the resulting shape, then select the fill, and lower its Opacity to 50%.


Step 19

Reselect shape number 4 and go to Object > Path > Offset Path. Enter a -1px Offset and click OK. Fill the resulting shape with the linear gradient shown in the second image, lower its Opacity to 30% and remove the stroke.


Step 20

Finally, focus on shape number 6. Fill it with R=230, G=231, B=232, then select the fill (from the Appearance panel), and lower its Opacity to 60%. Add a 0,25pt stroke for this shape, align it to outside, and set the color to R=241, G=242, B=242.


Step 21

Make two copies of shape 6. Select the top copy and hit the left arrow ten times. Reselect both copies and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel. Now focus on the resulting shape. Remove the stroke, then select the fill, and lower the Opacity to 30%.

Make two new copies of shape 6. Select the top copy, then hit the down arrow and the right arrow once. Reselect both copies and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel. Again, remove the stroke of the resulting shape, then select the fill, and lower its Opacity to 50%.


Step 22

Reselect shape number 6 and go to Object > Path > Offset Path. Enter a -1,5px Offset and click OK. Fill the resulting shape with the linear gradient shown in the second image, lower its Opacity to 50%, and remove the stroke.


Step 23

Select the oval shape that stands for the bottom of the jar and go to Object > Path > Offset Path. Enter a 3px Offset and click OK. Fill the resulting shape with R=109, G=110, B=113, lower its Opacity to 30%, then go to Effect > Blur > Gaussian Blur. Enter a 3px radius and then click OK.


Step 24

Let’s create the etiquette. First, re-enable the Snap to Grid (View > Snap to Grid). Pick the Rectangle Tool (M), create a 75px by 50px shape and place it as shown in the first image. Fill it with R=172, G=132, B=87, then go to Object > Path > Offset Path. Enter a -3px Offset and click OK. Fill the resulting shape with none and add a 2pt stroke. Align it to the inside, set the color to R=249, G=224, B=168, then go to Object > Expand Appearance.


Step 25

Select the brown shape made in the previous step and go to Effect > Stylize > Rounded Corners. Enter a 2px radius, click OK, then go to Object > Expand Appearance. Select the resulting shape and make a copy in back (Command + C > Command + B).

Select this copy, fill it with white, lower its Opacity to 30%, then go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Roughen. Enter the data shown in the second image, click OK, then go to Effect > Blur > Gaussian Blur. Enter a 3px radius and then click OK.


Step 26

Select the expanded stroke made two steps ago. Add a 0,25pt stroke for this shape, align it to outside, and set the color to R=196, G=154, B=108. Grab the Type Tool (T), click on your artboard, and add the “Do Not Open” text. Set the color to R=35, G=31, B=32, and use the Tall Paul font with a size of 13pt.


Step 27

Select the text along with the other three etiquette components and group them (Command + G). Select this new group and go to Effect > Warp > Arch. Enter the data shown below then click OK. Now, your etiquette should look like the following image.


Step 28

Duplicate the large shapes that make up the overall jar. Select these copies, click on the Unite button from the Pathfinder panel, and disable the Snap to Grid. Pick the Pen Tool (P) and create a shape like the one shown in the second image. Select it along with the other, fresh shape and click on the Intersect button from the Pathfinder panel. Fill the resulting shape with R=102, G=45, B=145, and move it into the bottom of the Layers panel, right above the background image.


Step 29

Pick the Ellipse Tool (L), create some random shapes, and place them as shown in the following image. Fill them with R=102, G=45, B=145, and move them into the bottom of the Layers panel, right above the shape made in the previous step. Now the jar is done.


Step 30

Let’s continue with the text. Grab the Type Tool (T) and add your text. Add each character separately. Again, use the Tall Paul font with a size of 230pt and set the color to R=78, G=35, B=110. As you can see I used the “CuRsE” word (“C,” “R,” “S” in uppercase and “u,” “e” in lowercase). Play with these characters, rotate them, and stick them to each other. Finally, select all these characters and go to Object > Expand.


Step 31

Select the shapes made in the previous step and go to Object > Path > Offset Path. Enter a 5px Offset and click OK. Delete the original shapes and keep these thicker shapes.


Step 32

Next you need to decrease the number of anchor points for the shapes made in the previous step. Select them and go to Object > Path > Simplify. Drag the Curve Precision slider to 95% and click OK.


Step 33

Let’s start adding the splashy effect for the text. Pick the Pen Tool (P) and draw a shape like the one shown in the following image. You can take a closer look at the zoomed areas to understand the little details of this shape.


Step 34

Next, you need to add some extra roundness to the overall text. Pick the Pen Tool (P) and draw some rounded shapes above the sharp areas of the text. Select all these purple shapes made in the last five steps and click on the Unite button from the Pathfinder panel.


Step 35

Pick the Pen Tool (P) and draw a shape like the white one shown in the first image. Select it along with the large purple shape and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel.


Step 36

Continue with the Pen Tool (P) and create a shape like the white one shown in the first image. Again, select it along with the large, purple shape and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel.


Step 37

Next, using the Pen Tool (P) and some patience, add the shapes shown in the following images. Again, take a closer look at the zoomed images to spot the little details.


Step 38

Select the shapes created in the previous step along with the large, purple shape, and click on the Unite button from the Pathfinder panel.


Step 39

Pick the Ellipse Tool (L) and click on your artboard. Enter 5 in the Width box and 50 in the Height box, then click OK. This will create a 5px by 50px ellipse. Fill it with R=78, G=35, B=110, and go to Effect > Warp > Arc. Enter the data shown below image #2, click OK, then go to Effect > Warp > Arc Lower.

Enter the data shown below image #3, click OK, then go to Effect > Warp > Fish. Enter the data shown below image #4, click OK, then go again to Effect > Warp > Arc. Enter the data shown below image #5, click OK, then go to Object > Expand Appearance.


Step 40

Select the shape made in the previous step and make several copies (Command + C > Command + F). Randomly resize these copies, rotate them and place them across the text as shown in the first image. Select these fresh shapes along with the large, purple shape and go to Object > Compound Path > Make. Fill the resulting shape with the radial gradient shown in the final image.


Step 41

Select the shape made in the previous step and go to Object > Path > Offset Path. Enter a -5 Offset and click OK. Duplicate the resulting shape. Select this copy, then hit the down arrow and the right arrow three times. Reselect these two, new shapes and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel.


Step 42

You should have a group of thin shapes resulted from the previous step. Fill these shapes with R=240, G=239, B=238. Now, select the entire group, change its blending mode to Overlay, then go to Effect > Blur > Gaussian Blur. Enter a 3px radius and click OK.


Step 43

Reselect the large, purple shape and make two copies (Command + C > Command + F). Select the top copy and hit the down arrow and the right arrow once. Reselect both copies and hit the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel. Fill the resulting shapes with R=102, G=45, B=145.


Step 44

Again, select the large, purple shape and make two copies (Command + C > Command + F). Select the top copy and hit the down arrow and the left arrow once. Reselect both copies and hit the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel. Fill the resulting shapes with R=54, G=24, B=76.


Step 45

Now let’s focus on the large, purple shape. Select it, then select the fill from the Appearance panel, and go to Effect > Stylize > Inner Glow. Enter the data shown in the following image and click OK. With this shape still selected, open then fly-out menu of the Appearance panel, and click on the Add New Fill. This will add a second fill for the selected shape. Select this new fill, make it black, lower its Opacity to 25%, change the blending mode to Overlay, then go to Effect > Sketch > Chrome. Enter the data shown below and click OK.


Step 46

Reselect the shape edited in the previous step and add a 0.5 stroke. Make it black and align it to the outside. Next, reselect the entire path and go to Effect > Stylize > Drop Shadow. Enter the data shown below and click OK. Now your text should look like the following image.


Step 47

Pick the Ellipse Tool (L) and make some small circles. Fill them with R=249, G=224, B=168 and place them as shown in the following image.


Step 48

Now that we’re done with the text let’s continue with the cork. Pick the Ellipse Tool (L) and create a 45px by 45px shape. Fill it with R=196, G=154, B=108. Place it as shown in the following image and go to Effect > 3D > Extrude & Bevel. Enter the data shown in the following image, click OK, then apply Object > Expand Appearance.


Step 49

Ungroup the two shapes resulted from the previous step. Select the bottom shape and fill it with the linear gradient shown below image #2. Make two copies of this shape. Select the top copy and hit the up arrow and the right arrow once. Reselect both copies and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel. Fill the resulting shape with R=71, G=44, B=26.


Step 50

Move to the other shape. First, fill it with the radial gradient shown below and then add a second fill. Select this new fill, make it black, lower its Opacity to 3%, then go to Effect > Artistic > Film Grain. Enter the data shown below image #2 and click OK.

Make a copy of this shape (Command + C > Command + F) and fill it only with white. Select this fresh copy along with the original shape and go to the Transparency panel. Open the fly-out menu and click on Make Opacity Mask. In the end your shape should look like the final image.


Step 51

Make two copies of the shape from the previous step. Select the top copy and hit the up arrow and the right arrow once. Reselect both copies and click on the Minus Front button from the Pathfinder panel. Fill the resulting shape only with R=117, G=76, B=41.

Reselect the two large components of the cork and duplicate them. Select these two copies and click on the Unite button from the Pathfinder panel. Fill the resulting shape with none, but add a 0,5 stroke. Align it to the outside and set the color to R=60, G=36, B=21.


Step 52

Select all the shapes that make up the cork and group them (Command + G). Select the group and go to Effect > Stylize > Drop Shadow. Enter the data shown below and click OK.


Step 53

Finally, you need to create a thin art brush. Pick the Ellipse Tool (L) and create a 16px by 1px shape. Fill it with R=54, G=24, B=76, then pick the Convert Selection Tool (Shift + C) and click on the right anchor point.

Now your shape should look like the second image. Select it and go to the Brushes panel (Window > Brushes). Open the fly-out and go to New Brush. Check Art Brush, click OK, enter the data shown in the following image and click OK.


Step 54

Pick the Brush Tool (B). Select the the art brush made in the previous step, add some random paths as shown in the following image and you’re done.


Conclusion

The final image is below.

Credit to:

Incoming search terms:

  • jar psd
  • free logo tuts illustrator
  • jar transparent psd
  • free psd illustration
  • text in illustrator
  • psd image ribbon flying out
  • free photoshop templates jar
  • Free jar potho shop
  • dedigns illustrator use tect
  • psd photoshop purple

free_PSD_by_TLMedia (1)

200+ Free PSD Resources

Using free resources helps you a lot because you save time that you would’ve spend designing these items. It’s always great when something that looks great it’s also free and you can use improving your designs. So why don’t you just download some resources to see that these free things makes your life easier! I am not talking of using them abundantly because your design has to be original but you can use a little bit from here, from there and make better effects to your design and also add some very cool stuff!
Here you have a huge collection of mixed useful resources that you need in webdesign!

 

Credit to: logolitic.com

Incoming search terms:

  • cd case psd
  • pic instagram psd
  • htc layout vector
  • htc vector
  • HTC phone vector free
  • glass website psd
  • psd social icons
  • social banners download
  • website styles
  • Free website designs sports

mixed_layer_style_by_anilcorn-d39tq6p

450+ Free Photoshop Layer Styles Collection by PsdFreak

Photoshop Layer Styles are very important in order to produce an high quality work.

They provide a great base of styles that are easily editable later on. They are allso can be used in creating web buttons, icons, logos and more.

good luck from PsdFreak.com Team!

 

Glowing PS styles

STYLES 01

 

80 Photoshop Styles

 

Photoshop Camo Styles

 

My Styles Archives

 

36 Random Styles

 

STYLES A

 

CHRISTMAS PHOTOSHOP STYLES

Mixed Layer Styles

 

60 Glitter Photoshop Styles

 

Glowing Text Styles

 

Incoming search terms:

  • free photoshop styles
  • free psd layer styles
  • free photoshop layer styles
  • free layer styles psd
  • jewelry text psd
  • photoshop free layer style
  • psd styles
  • psd layer styles
  • free photoshop style
  • photoshop layer styles free

Sponsored Ads

Ad
ChromeTextEffect

Chrome Text Effect|Photoshop Video Tutorial[HD]


In this HD tutorial I will show you how to apply chrome style to layers in Photoshop.
*Made by O.R Design: http://www.youtube.com/ordesigns
*For more speed arts,free psd’s,tutorials,free graphics and much more:
http://www.youtube.com/psdfreakcom
http://www.psdfreak.com – Free psd’s and photoshop resources!

Download PSD File!

 

 

 

Incoming search terms:

  • photoshop resources
  • free text psd
  • photoshop tutorials photo effects
  • photoshop tutorials text
  • chrome text effect photoshop
  • chrome psd
  • chrome TEXT psd
  • METALLIC TEXT psd
  • chrome effect photoshop
  • photoshop hd logo

frost-text-flatten-170

Realistic Frosty Text Effect with Moss/Lichen Texture-Photoshop tutorial

In this tutorial, I will show you the steps I took to Design a Realistic Frosty Text Effect with Moss/Lichen Texture in Photoshop. This is a beginner level tutorial with lots of tips and tricks about texturing, image adjustment and selection techniques.

To complete this tutorial, you will need the following stock:

Concrete Texture

Frost Ground Texture

Dirt Brush

Step 1

Create a new document (size doesn’t really matter for this tutorial) with black background. Firstly I would like to get into a bit of details about cloud render techniques in Photoshop.

Create a new layer on top and use the Lasso Tool with 40px feather, draw a selection as shown below:

Then go to Filter > Render > Clouds:

Set the foreground/background colour to be white and black, render some cloud inside the selection:

As you can see, because we added a 40px feather, the edge of the cloud becomes softer:

Bring up the Levels adjustment tool: (Ctrl + L)

Apply the following Levels adjustment settings:

Then use a soft eraser tool to gently erase the edge of the cloud so it fades into the background, you will have the following effect:

Then you can free-transform this piece of cloud into any shape you want, without having to worry about the edges:

You can duplicate this compressed cloud layer a few times and move them around the canvas for more effect:

Step 2

Use any font you like, type a letter into the centre of the canvas:

Apply the following layer blending option on the letter layer:

Bevel and Emboss

Gradient Overlay

Attach a layer mask onto this letter layer, use the dirt brush we downloaded + the chalk brush, erase parts of the letter:

As you can see, because of this layer mask, we now have cracked top and a icy effect for the letter:

and here is the overall effect so far:

Step 3

Now let’s a bit of texture for the text. Load the concrete texture into Photoshop. Select the letter and drag the selection onto the concrete texture:

Copy and paste the texture back to our document, make sure it covers the letter as shown below:

Change the blending mode of this concrete layer to “overlay”:

Use a hard eraser tool, carefully erase parts of the concrete texture so more frosty texture can be revealed:

Add the following two adjustment layer as clipping mask to this concrete texture layer:

Curves

Black and White (set layer opacity to around 50%)

and you will have the following effect:

Step 4

Let’s add some frozen ground texture onto the letter. Load the frozen ground image into Photoshop, again we copy and paste a piece of it onto our document, covering the letter as shown below:

Change the blending mode of this frost texture to “overlay”:

Add the following two adjustment layer as clipping mask to the frozen texture layer:

Black and white (set layer opacity to around 60%)

Levels

Optional: You can then add some particles (You can find lots of different particle brushes on the web) and more cloud effect around text.

Here is the effect I have so far:

Step 5

We’re almost done. For final retouches, I decided to sharpen the image a bit with the Reduce Noise filter: (Flatten the image first)

As you can see, the texture becomes more crispy:

I also used the Selective Color image adjustment tool to fine-tune the colour a bit:

With Selective Color tool, you can alter individual colour without affecting the rest of the image.

For instance, my image so far has cyan and neutral colour, so I choose “Cyans” and “Neutral” colours on the selective color tool for adjustment:

As you can see, the cyan/blue part of the image becomes more vibrant as a result:

For the neutral part of the image, I give them more yellowish/earth kind of the feeling:

Selective color can be quite powerful when it comes to adjusting colour separately, so use it wisely :)

and here is the final effect I have: (click to enlarge)

Credit to:

http://www.psdvault.com

Incoming search terms:

  • 3d text photoshop free psd
  • frost effect psd
  • free psd site designs
  • photoshop 3d text templates free
  • tutorial type frost
  • frost texture tutorials in photoshop
  • 3d text psd photoshop
  • wallpaper abstract dark psd
  • moss brush photoshop
  • pack psd text effects

Page 1 of 212

Recent Tweets

Follow Me On Twitter →

Latest Video


Hit Counter provided by technology reviews